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Exchange-Rate Regimes and International Trade: Evidence from the=20 Classical Gold Standard Era

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  • J. Ernesto L=F3pez-C=F3rdova

    (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • = =20 Chris Meissner

    (University of California, Berkeley)

Abstract

In this paper we show that the spread of the classical gold=20 standard in the late nineteenth century increased international trade=20 flows. This positive effect was compounded whenever a group of countries=20 formed a monetary union. Applying the gravity model of trade to more than=20 1,100 country pairs during the 1870-1910 period, we find that two countries= =20 on gold would trade 60 percent more with each other than with countries on= =20 a different monetary standard. Moreover, a monetary union would more than=20 double bilateral trade flows. Our findings are relevant for current=20 discussions on alternative monetary arrangements for the twenty-first= century.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Ernesto L=F3pez-C=F3rdova & = =20 Chris Meissner, 2001. "Exchange-Rate Regimes and International Trade: Evidence from the=20 Classical Gold Standard Era," Labor and Demography 0012003, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0012003 Note: 52 pages, Acrobat .pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. O Rourke, Kevin H. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2002. "When did globalisation begin?," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(01), pages 23-50, April.
    2. Andrew K. Rose, 1999. "One Money, One Market: Estimating the Effect of Common Currencies on Trade," NBER Working Papers 7432, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Frankel, Jeffrey A & Rose, Andrew K, 2000. "An Estimate of the Effect of Currency Unions on Trade and Output," CEPR Discussion Papers 2631, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Jeffrey Frankel & Andrew Rose, 2002. "An Estimate of the Effect of Common Currencies on Trade and Income," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 437-466.
    5. Charles Wyplosz, 1997. "EMU: Why and How It Might Happen," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 3-21, Fall.
    6. Maurice Obstfeld, 1997. "Europe's Gamble," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 28(2), pages 241-317.
    7. Michael D. Bordo & Lars Jonung, 1999. "The Future of EMU: What Does the History of Monetary Unions Tell Us?," NBER Working Papers 7365, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Frieden, Jeffry A., 1997. "Monetary Populism in Nineteenth-Century America: An Open Economy Interpretation," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(02), pages 367-395, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Alesina & Robert J. Barro & Silvana Tenreyro, 2003. "Optimal Currency Areas," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2002, Volume 17, pages 301-356 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • N21 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N26 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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