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Construction of the Earnings and Benefits File (EBF) for Use with the Health and Retirement Survey

  • Olivia S. Mitchell
  • Jan Olson
  • Thomas Steinmeier

Analysts using the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) often require information on earnings, labor market attachment, and social security benefits in order to better understand the factors affecting retirement and well-being at older ages. To this end, several derived variables were constructed and documented in the Earnings and Benefits File (EBF) described here. The EBF provides a set of summary earnings, employment, and social security wealth measures for a subset of HRS respondents in Wave 1 of the survey, for whom administrative records are available. The EBF, a restricted data file, is available from the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research for matching only with versions of the HRS containing geographic detail no finer than the Census Division level. Interested users should contact by email for further information on access to the data.

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Paper provided by Wharton School Pension Research Council, University of Pennsylvania in its series Pension Research Council Working Papers with number 98-19.

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Date of creation:
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Publication status: Published in Forecasting Retirement Needs and Retirement Wealth. 2000: 327-359.
Handle: RePEc:wop:pennpr:98-19
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Wharton School, 3641 Locust Walk, 304 CPC, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6218
Phone: 215-898-7620
Fax: 215-898-0310
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  1. Gustman, Alan L & Steinmeier, Thomas L, 1986. "A Structural Retirement Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(3), pages 555-84, May.
  2. Alan L. Gustman & Olivia S. Mitchell & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1994. "Retirement Research Using the Health and Retirement Survey," NBER Working Papers 4813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Michael D. Hurd, 1988. "The Joint Retirement Decision of Husbands and Wives," NBER Working Papers 2803, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Pozzebon, Silvana & Mitchell, Olivia S, 1989. "Married Women's Retirement Behavior," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 39-53.
  5. Alan L. Gustman & Olivia S. Mitchell, 1990. "Pensions and the U.S. Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 3331, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Olivia S. Mitchell, 1987. "Social Security Reforms and Poverty Among Older Dual-Earner Couples," NBER Working Papers 2382, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Hurd, Michael D, 1990. "Research on the Elderly: Economic Status, Retirement, and Consumption and Saving," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 28(2), pages 565-637, June.
  8. Joseph F. Quinn & Richard V. Burkhauser & Daniel A. Myers, 1990. "Passing the Torch: The Influence of Economic Incentives on Work and Retirement," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number pt.
  9. Thompson, Lawrence H, 1983. "The Social Security Reform Debate," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 21(4), pages 1425-67, December.
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