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Six Dimensions of Concentration in Economics: Scientometric Evidence from a Large-Scale Data Set

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  • Glötzl, Florentin

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  • Aigner, Ernest

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Abstract

This paper scientometrically investigates concentration in economics between 1956 and 2016 using a large-scale data set. It is revealed that economics is highly concentrated along six dimensions: articles, journals, regions, institutions, authors, and paradigms. North America accounts for half of all published articles and three quarters of all citations, while the top twenty academic institutions reap a share of 42 percent of all citations. The top 100 authors alone receive a share of 15 percent. Five journals account for 27.7 percent of all citations and only 8 percent of all articles, and 3 percent of all citations may be attributed to heterodox schools of thought. The overall Gini coefficient for the distribution of citations among articles is 0.72. Generally, concentration is found to increase towards the top of the discipline and to be higher and more persistent on the level of citations than on the level of articles. Concentration has increased over the last few decades, with the strongest increases occurring already until the 1970s.

Suggested Citation

  • Glötzl, Florentin & Aigner, Ernest, 2017. "Six Dimensions of Concentration in Economics: Scientometric Evidence from a Large-Scale Data Set," Ecological Economic Papers 5488, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wus045:5488
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:scient:v:116:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-018-2755-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. John Gibson, 2018. "The Micro-Geography of Academic Research:How Distinctive is Economics?," Working Papers in Economics 18/03, University of Waikato.
    3. Claudius Graebner, 2017. "The Complexity of Economies and Pluralism in Economics," ICAE Working Papers 69, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.
    4. Christian Grimm & Jakob Kapeller & Stephan Puehringer, 2018. "Paradigms and Policies: The state of economics in the german-speaking countries," ICAE Working Papers 77, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.
    5. Ernest Aigner & Florentin Gloetzl & Matthias Aistleitner & Jakob Kapeller, 2018. "The focus of academic economics: before and after the crisis," ICAE Working Papers 75, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.

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    Keywords

    concentration; economics; scientometrics;

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