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Children at Risk: Infant and Child Health in Central Asia

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  • Cynthia Buckley

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Abstract

Using Demographic and Health Surveys, government statistics, and field observations I examine trends in infant and child health in Uzbekistan, Kazakstan and the Kyrgyz Republic. Health indicators (anemia and marked low weight for age) for the population under the age of 3 are examined nationally, regionally and by ethnic groups. Findings indicate the risk of compromised child health varies by ethnicity, but the effect is dramatically lessened by the introduction of household and maternal controls such as parental education, residence, and mother???s health status. Findings highlight the social costs of transition, illustrate the importance of maternal health across the region, and assist in the identification of groups at highest risk for poor child health within individual countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Cynthia Buckley, 2003. "Children at Risk: Infant and Child Health in Central Asia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 523, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2003-523
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39908/3/wp523.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrews, Matthew R. & Hay, Roger & Myers, Jerrett, 2010. "Governance Indicators Can Make Sense: Under-five Mortality Rates are an Example," Scholarly Articles 4448994, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Olena Y. Nizalova & Maria Vyshnya, 2010. "Evaluation of the impact of the Mother and Infant Health Project in Ukraine," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 107-125, September.
    3. Matt Andrews & Roger Hay & Jerrett Myers, 2010. "Governance Indicators Can Make Sense: Under-five Mortality Rates are an Example," CID Working Papers 207, Center for International Development at Harvard University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child Health; Central Asia; Transitionary Economies; Anemia; Stunting; Maternal Health;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

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