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The Economic Determinants of the Internal Migration Flows in Russia During Transition

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  • Annette N. Brown

Abstract

I analyze the patterns of migration by testing the influence of traditional economic and amenity factors and of housing market reform on the direction of migration flows. I improve on the few previous studies of Russian migration during transition by analyzing gross flows rather than net flows in order to properly distinguish effects, and by analyzing a much wider set of factors. The results indicate that even early in transition, migration responds to average wages and prices. In particular, higher average wages and lower prices positively determine immigration. Higher average wages also positively determine outmigration. Apartment privatization significantly affects migration even after only the first year of the reform. Amenity and demographic factors generally influence migration as expected. Several checks confirm the robustness of these results.

Suggested Citation

  • Annette N. Brown, 1997. "The Economic Determinants of the Internal Migration Flows in Russia During Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 89, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:1997-89
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeni Klugman & John Micklewright & Gerry Redmond, 2002. "Poverty in the Transition: Social expenditures and the working-age poor," Papers inwopa02/18, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2016. "Inter-regional Population Migration in Russia Revisited: Analysis on Origin-to-Destination Matrix, 1990-2013," CEI Working Paper Series 2016-2, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Walsh, Patrick Paul & Whelan, Ciara, 2001. "Firm performance and the political economy of corporate governance: survey evidence for Bulgaria, Hungary, Slovakia and Slovenia," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 85-112, June.
    4. Vakulenko, Elena, 2012. "Migration in Russian cities: Econometric analysis," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 25(1), pages 25-50.
    5. Omar S. Arias & Carolina Sánchez-Páramo & María E. Dávalos & Indhira Santos & Erwin R. Tiongson & Carola Gruen & Natasha de Andrade Falcão & Gady Saiovici & Cesar A. Cancho, 2014. "Back to Work : Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16570.
    6. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0844-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:mth:bmh888:v:4:y:2016:i:2:p:34-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Berger, Mark C. & Blomquist, Glenn C. & Sabirianova Peter, Klara, 2008. "Compensating differentials in emerging labor and housing markets: Estimates of quality of life in Russian cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 25-55, January.
    9. Yuriy Shmidt & Natalya Ivashina & Pavel Lobodin & Aleksey Kuhlevskiy, 2017. "Forecasting of Interregional Migration Flows," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(1), pages 126-136.
    10. Gang, Ira N & Stuart, Robert C, 2002. "The Political Economy of Russian City Growth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(3), pages 491-508, April.
    11. Aleksey Oshchepkov, 2007. "Are Interregional Wage Differentials in Russia Compensative?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 750, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Yuri Andrienko & Sergei Guriev, 2003. "Determinants of Interregional Mobility in Russia: Evidence from Panel Data," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 551, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    13. Osborne, Stefan & Trueblood, Michael A., 2001. "An Examination Of Economic Efficiency Of Russian Crop Output In The Reform Period," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20548, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    14. Vakulenko, Elena & Mkrtchyan , Nikita & Furmanov, Kirill, 2011. "Modeling registered migration flows between regions of the Russian Federation," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 21(1), pages 35-55.
    15. Guido Friebel & Sergei Guriev, 1999. "Why Russian Workers Do Not Move: Attachment of Workers Through In-Kind Payments," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 283, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    16. Daniel Tsegai & Quang Bao Le, 2011. "District-level spatial analysis of migration flows in Ghana: determinants and implications for policy," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 87-100, June.
    17. L.A. Grogan, 1997. "Wage Dispersion in Russia," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 97-075/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    18. E. Vakulenko & N. Mkrtchyan & K. Furmanov, 2011. "Econometric Analysis Of Internal Migration In Russia," Montenegrin Journal of Economics, Economic Laboratory for Transition Research (ELIT), vol. 7(2), pages 21-33.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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