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Exporting, externalities, and technology transfer

Author

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  • Pack, Howard
  • Saggi, Kamal

Abstract

Developed-country purchasers of exports from developing-country industrial firms have often provided considerable technical aid to the exporting firms. Some question the benefits to both OECD and developing country firms of such transfers. The authors developed a model to analyze the implications of diffusion of the transferred technology to other developing country firms and the impact of the market entry of additional firms. Surprisingly, diffusion upstream combined with entry downstream may increase the profits of both the OECD importer and its initial developing-country supplier because the diffusion increases competition both upstream and downstream. The intuition isthat a firm does not necessarily lose from competition in its market so long as its buyer/supplier is also forced to behave more competitively as a result of diffusion. A limited amount of increased competition at both stages moves the two firms closer to a vertically integrated firm.

Suggested Citation

  • Pack, Howard & Saggi, Kamal, 1999. "Exporting, externalities, and technology transfer," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2065, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:2065
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ethier, Wilfred J. & Markusen, James R., 1996. "Multinational firms, technology diffusion and trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1-2), pages 1-28, August.
    2. Pack, Howard & Saggi, Kamal, 1997. "Inflows of Foreign Technology and Indigenous Technological Development," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(1), pages 81-98, February.
    3. Sofronis K. Clerides & Saul Lach & James R. Tybout, 1998. "Is Learning by Exporting Important? Micro-Dynamic Evidence from Colombia, Mexico, and Morocco," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 903-947.
    4. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-963, September.
    5. Levy, B., 1989. "Export Traders, Market Development, And Industrial Expansion," Center for Development Economics 114, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    6. Saggi, Kamal, 1996. "Entry into a Foreign Market: Foreign Direct Investment versus Licensing," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(1), pages 99-104, February.
    7. Kabiraj, Tarun & Marjit, Sugata, 1993. "International technology transfer under potential threat of entry : A Cournot-Nash framework," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 75-88, October.
    8. Amy Jocelyn Glass & Kamal Saggi, 1999. "Foreign Direct Investment and the Nature of R&D," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 92-117, February.
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