IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

To move or not to move? The relationship between career management and preferred career moves


  • De Vos, A.


  • Dewettinck, K.


  • Dirk Buyens

    () (Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School)


This paper explores professional employees’ career move preferences and the impact of both individual and organizational career management. Departing from theoretical work on the “new career”, different types of career moves employees can make on the internal labor market are discussed (i.e. vertical moves, lateral moves, job enrichment and temporary moves). Next, these are related to the literature on both organizational and individual career management. Hypotheses are formulated about professional employees’ preferences for making distinct types of internal career moves and about the extent to which these preferences are affected by (a) employees’ individual career management initiatives and (b) four distinct bundles of organizational career management practices (succession management, potential assessment, feedback and development). The results of a study among 472 professional employees from one company are presented, which indicate that the preferences for both vertical career moves and moves relating to job enrichment and temporary moves are significantly affected by individual career management, but not by organizational career management practices. The preference for making lateral moves could not be explained by our antecedent variables, but was affected by managerial ambition and variables relating to respondents’ family situation. The implications of our findings for stimulating internal career mobility are discussed, and suggestions for further research are made.

Suggested Citation

  • De Vos, A. & Dewettinck, K. & Dirk Buyens, 2006. "To move or not to move? The relationship between career management and preferred career moves," Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School Working Paper Series 2006-20, Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School.
  • Handle: RePEc:vlg:vlgwps:2006-20

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Laitinen, Ek, 1993. "Financial predictors for different phases of the failure process," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 215-228, March.
    2. Everett, Jim & Watson, John, 1998. "Small Business Failure and External Risk Factors," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 371-390, December.
    3. Dimitras, A. I. & Slowinski, R. & Susmaga, R. & Zopounidis, C., 1999. "Business failure prediction using rough sets," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 263-280, April.
    4. Pompe, Paul P.M. & Bilderbeek, Jan, 2005. "The prediction of bankruptcy of small- and medium-sized industrial firms," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 847-868, November.
    5. H. Ooghe & N. Waeyaert, 2003. "Oorzaken van faling en falingspaden: Literatuuroverzicht en conceptueel verklaringsmodel," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 03/187, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    6. OOGHE, Hubert & WAEYAERT, Nick, 2004. "Oorzaken van faling: Literatuuroverzicht en conceptueel verklaringsmodel," Economic and Social Journal (Economisch en Sociaal Tijdschrift), University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics, vol. 57(4), pages 367-393, Februari.
    7. Donald C. Hambrick & Richard A. D'Aveni, 1992. "Top Team Deterioration as Part of the Downward Spiral of Large Corporate Bankruptcies," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 38(10), pages 1445-1466, October.
    8. S. Balcaen & H. Ooghe, 2004. "35 years of studies on business failure: an overview of the classical statistical methodologiesand their related problems," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 04/248, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. N. Soens & A. De Vos & D. Buyens, 2006. "Explaining company-level influences on individual career choices: towards a transitional career pattern? Evidence from Belgium," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 06/397, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    2. Itani, Sami & Järlström, Maria & Piekkari, Rebecca, 2015. "The meaning of language skills for career mobility in the new career landscape," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 368-378.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:vlg:vlgwps:2006-20. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Isabelle Vandenbroere). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.