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Three Revolutions in Macroeconomics: Their Nature and Influence

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Abstract

Harry Johnson’s 1971 ideas about the factors affecting the success of the Keynesian Revolution and the Monetarist Counter-revolution are summarised and extended to the analysis of the Rational Expectations - New Classical (RE-NC) Revolution. It is then argued that, whereas Monetarism brought about a revival of the quantity theory of money from the limbo into which Keynesianism had pushed it, RE-NC modelling was responsible for that theory’s most recent disappearance. This happened despite the fact that, initially, RE-NC economics appeared to be a mainly technical extension and refinement of Monetarism, rather than a radically new economic doctrine. Some implications of this story for todays’ macroeconomics are briefly discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • David Laidler, 2013. "Three Revolutions in Macroeconomics: Their Nature and Influence," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20134, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwo:epuwoc:20134
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Laidler, 2010. "The Monetary Economy and the Economic Crisis," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20101, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
    2. Milton Friedman & Anna J. Schwartz, 1963. "A Monetary History of the United States, 1867–1960," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie63-1.
    3. P.D. Jonson & E.R. Moses & C.R. Wymer, 1976. "A Minimal Model of the Australian Economy," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp7601, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael T. Belongia & Peter N. Ireland, 2013. "Instability: Monetary and Real," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 830, Boston College Department of Economics.
    2. Michael T. Belongia & Peter N. Ireland, 2016. "Money and Output: Friedman and Schwartz Revisited," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(6), pages 1223-1266, September.
    3. Boris Salazar & Daniel Otero, 2015. "La revolución de los nuevos clásicos: redes, influencia y metodología," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 17(32), pages 39-69, January-J.
    4. David Laidler, 2013. "Reassessing the Thesis of the Monetary History," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20135, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
    5. Craig Freedman & Geoff C. Harcourt & Peter Kriesler & John Nevilet, 2013. "Milton Friedman: Constructing an Anti-Keynes," Discussion Papers 2013-35, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Keynesianism; Monetarism; Rational expectations New Classical economics Quantity Theory; Money; Velocity; Monetary policy; Inflation; Unemployment; Business cycle; Phillips curve;

    JEL classification:

    • B21 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Microeconomics
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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