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Environmental Efficiency and Its Determinants in China’s Regional Economies

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  • Yanrui Wu

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

Abstract

The increasing awareness of environmental protection has put great pressure on the improvement in environmental regulations in China. How has the current system performed in the nation’s rapidly growing economy? The answer to this question is either controversial or yet to be explored in the case of China. The objective of this paper is to present a quantitative analysis of environmental performance in China’s regional economies and to examine the determinants of regional variation in performance. The findings are employed to draw policy implications for environmental protection and shed light on sustainable development in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Yanrui Wu, 2007. "Environmental Efficiency and Its Determinants in China’s Regional Economies," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 07-21, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:07-21
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    File URL: http://www.business.uwa.edu.au/school/disciplines/economics/?a=98661
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wang, Hua & Wheeler, David, 2005. "Financial incentives and endogenous enforcement in China's pollution levy system," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 174-196, January.
    2. Hua Wang & Yanhong Jin, 2007. "Industrial Ownership and Environmental Performance: Evidence from China," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 36(3), pages 255-273, March.
    3. Coelli, Tim & Perelman, Sergio, 1999. "A comparison of parametric and non-parametric distance functions: With application to European railways," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 326-339, September.
    4. He, Jie, 2006. "Pollution haven hypothesis and environmental impacts of foreign direct investment: The case of industrial emission of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Chinese provinces," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 228-245, November.
    5. Wang, Hua, 2002. "Pollution regulation and abatement efforts: evidence from China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 85-94, April.
    6. Yanrui Wu, 2007. "Capital Stock Estimates for China's Regional Economies: Results and Analyses," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 07-16, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    7. Dasgupta, Susmita & Laplante, Benoit & Mamingi, Nlandu & Wang, Hua, 2001. "Inspections, pollution prices, and environmental performance: evidence from China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 487-498, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Chunhong & Liu, Haiying & Bressers, Hans Th.A. & Buchanan, Karen S., 2011. "Productivity growth and environmental regulations - accounting for undesirable outputs: Analysis of China's thirty provincial regions using the Malmquist–Luenberger index," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2369-2379.

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