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The modern revival of the Classical surplus approach: implications for the analysis of growth and crises

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  • Sergio Cesaratto

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Abstract

The paper reviews the main elements of Modern Classical Theory in view of the analysis of contemporary societies and in particular: the recovery of the Classical and Marxist “surplus approach” as a solid foundation for the analysis of social conflict; a demand-led theory of the level and growth of output based on the rejection of Say’s Law and the recovery of the notion of “external markets” put forward by Rosa Luxembourg and Kalecki, as the framework for the investigation of growth and crises in different historical phases of capitalism; the dismantling of the analytical core of Marginalism and of its laissez-faire policy prescriptions; and finally, the rejection of methodological individualism and of subjectivism in economic analysis and the preservation of the analytical methods of the Classical economists and Marx. In this regard, the paper underlines some differences with other heterodox schools, but also convergence with endogenous money theory and with systemic views of technical change.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergio Cesaratto, 2016. "The modern revival of the Classical surplus approach: implications for the analysis of growth and crises," Department of Economics University of Siena 735, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  • Handle: RePEc:usi:wpaper:735
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    File URL: http://repec.deps.unisi.it/quaderni/735.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Sergio Cesaratto, 2015. "Neo-Kaleckian and Sraffian Controversies on the Theory of Accumulation," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(2), pages 154-182, April.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. In due Bocconi, video & presentazione
      by Sergio Cesaratto in Politica&EconomiaBlog on 2019-04-11 06:16:00

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Classical economists; Sraffa; Kalecki; Keynes; Surplus approach; heterodox economics;

    JEL classification:

    • B12 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Classical (includes Adam Smith)
    • B24 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Socialist; Marxist; Scraffian
    • B51 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Socialist; Marxian; Sraffian
    • E11 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Marxian; Sraffian; Kaleckian

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