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Earnings benefits of Tulsa's pre-K program for different income groups

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Abstract

This paper estimates future adult earnings effects associated with a universal pre-K program in Tulsa, Oklahoma. These informed projections help to compensate for the lack of long-term data on universal pre-K programs, while using metrics that relate test scores to valued social benefits. Combining test-score data from the fall of 2006 and recent findings by Chetty et al. (forthcoming) on the relationship between kindergarten test scores and adult earnings, we generate plausible projections of adult earnings effects and a partial cost-benefit analysis of the Tulsa pre-K program. We find substantial projected earnings benefits for program participants who differ by income and by program dosage. The dollar effects and benefit-cost ratios are similar across groups, with benefit-to-cost ratios of approximately 3 or 4 to 1. Because we only consider adult earnings benefits, actual benefit-cost ratios are likely higher, especially for disadvantaged children.
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  • Timothy J. Barik & William Gormley & Shirley Adelstein, "undated". "Earnings benefits of Tulsa's pre-K program for different income groups," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles tjb2012eer, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:tjb2012eer
    Note: Appears in Economics of Education Review 31(6): 1143-1161
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775712001021
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    Cited by:

    1. Sneha Elango & Jorge Luis García & James J. Heckman & Andrés Hojman, 2015. "Early Childhood Education," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 2, pages 235-297 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Wong, Ho Lun & Luo, Renfu & Zhang, Linxiu & Rozelle, Scott, 2013. "The impact of vouchers on preschool attendance and elementary school readiness: A randomized controlled trial in rural China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 53-65.
    3. Timothy J. Bartik & JOnathan A. Belford & William T. Gormley & Sara Anderson, 2016. "A Benefit-Cost Analysis of the Tulsa Universal Pre-K Program," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-261, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Timothy J. Bartik, 2013. "Effects of the Pre-K Program of Kalamazoo County Ready 4s on Kindergarten Entry Test Scores: Estimates Based on Data from the Fall of 2011 and the Fall of 2012," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 13-198, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    preschool; returns to preschool; economic development; tulsa;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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