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Strategy communication and measurement systems

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  • Pascal Courty

Abstract

Organizations often face the challenge of communicating their strategies to local decision makers. The difficulty presents itself in finding a way to measure performance wich meaningfully conveys how to implement the organization's strategy at local levels. I show that organizations solve this communication problem by combining performance measures in such a way that performance gains come closest to mimicking value-added as defined by the organization's strategy. I further show how organizations rebalance performance measures in response to changes in their strategies. Applications to the design of performance metrics, gaming, and divisional performance evaluation are considered. The paper also suggests several empirical ways to evaluate the practical importance of the communication role of measurement systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Pascal Courty, 1997. "Strategy communication and measurement systems," Economics Working Papers 330, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:330
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    File URL: https://econ-papers.upf.edu/papers/330.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Baker, George P & Jensen, Michael C & Murphy, Kevin J, 1988. " Compensation and Incentives: Practice vs. Theory," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(3), pages 593-616, July.
    2. Holmstrom, Bengt & Milgrom, Paul, 1991. "Multitask Principal-Agent Analyses: Incentive Contracts, Asset Ownership, and Job Design," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(0), pages 24-52, Special I.
    3. Courty, Pascal & Marschke, Gerald, 1997. "Measuring Government Performance: Lessons from a Federal Job-Training Program," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 383-388, May.
    4. Bengt Holmstrom, 1979. "Moral Hazard and Observability," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 74-91, Spring.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Measurement systems; firm objective; performance measurament; communication;

    JEL classification:

    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory

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