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Trade, technology, and absorptive capacity: Firm-level evidence across geographical clusters in the Tanzanian textiles and apparel sector

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Listed:
  • Amrita Saha
  • André Castro
  • Marco Carreras
  • Daniele Guariso

Abstract

Trade-linked technological change has potential to increase incomes in low-income countries (LICs). The most labour-intensive segments of the textiles and apparel global value chain are in LICs. However, gaps between available technologies and best practices make it difficult to adopt more efficient production processes or move into higher value-added functions. This paper examines current technology use in the Tanzanian textiles and apparel sector, using nationally representative secondary data, primary quantitative data, and qualitative information from semi-structured interviews.

Suggested Citation

  • Amrita Saha & André Castro & Marco Carreras & Daniele Guariso, 2020. "Trade, technology, and absorptive capacity: Firm-level evidence across geographical clusters in the Tanzanian textiles and apparel sector," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-96, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2020-96
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/Publications/Working-paper/PDF/wp2020-96.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Absorptive capacity; Firm productivity; Global value chains; Tanzania; Textiles; Apparel industry;
    All these keywords.

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