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Regression-based Inequality Decomposition: Pitfalls and a Solution Procedure


  • Wan, Guanghua


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  • Wan, Guanghua, 2002. "Regression-based Inequality Decomposition: Pitfalls and a Solution Procedure," WIDER Working Paper Series 101, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:dp2002-101

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dagum, Camilo, 1990. "On the relationship between income inequality measures and social welfare functions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1-2), pages 91-102.
    2. Jonathan Morduch & Terry Sicular, 2002. "Rethinking Inequality Decomposition, With Evidence from Rural China," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(476), pages 93-106, January.
    3. Anthony Shorrocks & Daniel Slottje, 2002. "Approximating unanimity orderings: An application to Lorenz dominance," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 77(1), pages 91-117, December.
    4. Bourguignon, Francois & Fournier, M & Gurgand, M, 2001. "Fast Development with a Stable Income Distribution: Taiwan, 1979-94," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 47(2), pages 139-163, June.
    5. Wan, Guang Hua, 2001. "Changes in regional inequality in rural China: decomposing the Gini index by income sources," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 45(3), September.
    6. Guang Wan & Enjiang Cheng, 2001. "Effects of land fragmentation and returns to scale in the Chinese farming sector," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 183-194.
    7. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
    8. Maria Cancian & Deborah Reed, 1998. "Assessing The Effects Of Wives' Earnings On Family Income Inequality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 73-79, February.
    9. Fields, Gary S & Yoo, Gyeongjoon, 2000. "Falling Labor Income Inequality in Korea's Economic Growth: Patterns and Underlying Causes," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(2), pages 139-159, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neil Foster-McGregor & Sebastian Leitner & Sandra M. Leitner & Johannes Pöschl & Robert Stehrer, 2014. "Earnings Distributions and Dimensions of Inequality," wiiw Research Reports 399, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    2. Sebastian Leitner, 2015. "Drivers of wealth inequality in euro area countries," Working Paper Reihe der AK Wien - Materialien zu Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft 137, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik.
    3. C. Chameni Nembua, 2012. "Inequality factor decomposition under uniform additions property with applications to Cameroonian rural data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(14), pages 1365-1371, September.
    4. Quheng Deng & Shi Li, 2009. "What Lies behind Rising Earnings Inequality in Urban China? Regression-based Decompositions," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 55(3-4), pages 598-623.
    5. Yu, Kang & Xin, Xian & Guo, Ping & Liu, Xiaoyun, 2011. "Foreign direct investment and China's regional income inequality," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1348-1353, May.
    6. Daniel Suryadarma & Rima Prama Artha & Asep Suryahadi & Sudarno Sumarto, 2005. "A Reassessment of Inequality and Its Role in Poverty Reduction in Indonesia," Development Economics Working Papers 22543, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    7. Xu, Xinkuo & Han, Liyan & Lv, Xiaofeng, 2016. "Household carbon inequality in urban China, its sources and determinants," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 77-86.
    8. Balisacan, Arsenio M. & Fuwa, Nobuhiko, 2004. "Changes in Spatial Income Inequality in the Philippines: An Exploratory Analysis," WIDER Working Paper Series 034, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Lee, Wai Choi & Cheong, Tsun Se & Wu, Yanrui, 2017. "The Impacts of Financial Development, Urbanization, and Globalization on Income Inequality: A Regression-based Decomposition Approach," ADBI Working Papers 651, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    10. Fujii, Tomoki, 2017. "Has the Development Gap between the Ethnic Minority and Majority Groups Narrowed in Viet Nam? Evidence from Household Surveys," ADBI Working Papers 661, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    11. Paolo Verme & Branko Milanovic & Sherine Al-Shawarby & Sahar El Tawila & May Gadallah & Enas Ali A. El-Majeed, 2014. "Inside Inequality in the Arab Republic of Egypt : Facts and Perceptions across People, Time, and Space," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 17583.
    12. Zhao Chen & Ming Lu & Guanghua Wan, 2010. "Inter-Industry Wage Differentials: An Increasingly Important Contributor to Urban China Income Inequality," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd09-130, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    13. Sebastian Leitner & Robert Stehrer, 2014. "Drivers of Inequality and Poverty in the CEE and other EU Member States," wiiw Research Reports 398, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.


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