IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/unm/unuint/200409.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Learning New Technologies by SMEs in Developing Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji

    () (United Nations University, Institute for New Technologies)

  • Lal, Kaushalesh

    () (United Nations University, Institute for New Technologies)

Abstract

This paper, based on new field data, examines the ways in which small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in selected developing countries learn to use and augment their core capabilities with new technologies. This paper presents three findings. First, there is clear evidence of increasing complexity in the adoption and use of ICTs among developing country firms. Second, climbing the technological ladder requires skills upgrading through explicit learning of the new technologies. Third, firm performance is highly associated with learning capabilities, levels of technology, and a host of firm-level knowledge, skills and experience. The study found that across countries and sectors, non-formal learning is the dominant form of mastering new technologies. However, formal local and overseas training are positively associated with increasing technological complexity. There is also a close correlation between technical complexity of firms' internal ICT tools and available telecommunication infrastructure.

Suggested Citation

  • Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji & Lal, Kaushalesh, 2004. "Learning New Technologies by SMEs in Developing Countries," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 09, United Nations University - INTECH.
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unuint:200409
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.intech.unu.edu/publications/discussion-papers/2004-9.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lal, K., 2004. "E-Business and Export Behavior: Evidence from Indian Firms," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 505-517, March.
    2. Piva, Mariacristina & Santarelli, Enrico & Vivarelli, Marco, 2005. "The skill bias effect of technological and organisational change: Evidence and policy implications," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 141-157, March.
    3. Bengt-ake Lundvall & Bjorn Johnson, 1994. "The Learning Economy," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 23-42.
    4. Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji, 2004. "Learning and Local Knowledge Institutions in African Industry," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 02, United Nations University - INTECH.
    5. Ken Ducatel, 1998. "Learning and Skills in the Knowledge Economy," DRUID Working Papers 98-2, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
    6. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1998. "The Origins of Technology-Skill Complementarity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 693-732.
    7. Bj–rn Johnson & Edward Lorenz & Bengt-Åke Lundvall, 2002. "Why all this fuss about codified and tacit knowledge?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 245-262.
    8. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1962. "The Economic Implications of Learning by Doing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(3), pages 155-173.
    9. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10054 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji & Lal, Kaushalesh, 2004. "Sectoral Pattern of E-business Adoption in Developing Countries," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 07, United Nations University - INTECH.
    11. Lundvall, Bengt-Ake & Johnson, Bjorn & Andersen, Esben Sloth & Dalum, Bent, 2002. "National systems of production, innovation and competence building," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 213-231, February.
    12. Bound, John & Johnson, George, 1992. "Changes in the Structure of Wages in the 1980's: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 371-392, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chaminade, Cristina & Vang, Jan, 2005. "Innovation Policies for Small and Medium Size Enterprises in Asia: An Innovation Systems Perspective," Papers in Innovation Studies 2005/6, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    2. Chaminade, Cristina & Vang, Jan, 2006. "Innovation policy for Asian SMEs: Exploring cluster differences," Papers in Innovation Studies 2006/3, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:unm:unuint:200409. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ad Notten). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/meritnl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.