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Quantitative Easing: A Keynesian Critique


  • Thomas I. Palley


Keynesian economists have generally supported quantitative easing (QE) on grounds it increases aggregate demand and anything that increases demand at this time of demand shortage is welcome. This paper argues that response may be misplaced. QE may back fire with respect to demand stimulus, create potentially significant future dangers, and is supportive of a plutocratic political economy based on “asset market trickle-down” that obstructs needed policy change.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas I. Palley, 2011. "Quantitative Easing: A Keynesian Critique," Working Papers wp252, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp252

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Thomas I. Palley, 1993. "Uncertainty, Expectations, and The Future: If We Don’t Know the Answers, What Are the Questions?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 3-18, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chiarella Carl & Flaschel Peter & Köper Carsten & Proaño Christian & Semmler Willi, 2012. "Macroeconomic Stabilization Policies in Intrinsically Unstable Macroeconomies," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 1-38, April.
    2. Stefan Behrendt, 2013. "Monetary Transmission via the Central Bank Balance Sheet," Global Financial Markets Working Paper Series 49-2013, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    3. Thomas I. Palley, 2015. "Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound and After: A Reassessment of Quantitative Easing and Critique of the Federal Reserve's Proposed Exit Strategy," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(1), pages 1-27, February.
    4. Wang, Yi-Chen & Wang, Ching-Wen & Huang, Chia-Hsing, 2015. "The impact of unconventional monetary policy on the tail risks of stock markets between U.S. and Japan," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 41-51.

    More about this item


    quantitative easing; monetary policy; asset prices;

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies


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