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The Impact of Taxes on Migration in New England


  • Jeffrey Thompson


Evidence from surveys of migrating households, the existing economic literature, and new analysis using data from the Internal Revenue Service all suggest that taxes do not play any notable role in causing people to leave a state. The most important factors in influencing household migration are employment and family-related reasons. If anything, higher state income taxes decrease the number of people leaving a state. Taxes do appear to influence the choice of which state to live in once a person has decided to move, but the impact is modest. If states use the revenues from higher taxes to create jobs, reduce unemployment, and reduce property crime, the small negative impacts from taxes can be easily overcome.>> Download the full study>> Download the four-page research briefs: > New England > Connecticut > Maine > Massachusetts > New Hampshire > Rhode Island > Vermont>> Download the regional press release

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  • Jeffrey Thompson, 2011. "The Impact of Taxes on Migration in New England," Published Studies migration_peri_april13, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:perips:migration_peri_april13

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    1. Greg Kaplan & Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2012. "Interstate Migration Has Fallen Less Than You Think: Consequences of Hot Deck Imputation in the Current Population Survey," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 1061-1074, August.
    2. Young, Cristobal & Varner, Charles, 2011. "Millionaire Migration and State Taxation of Top Incomes: Evidence From a Natural Experiment," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 64(2), pages 255-283, June.
    3. Andrew Leigh, 2005. "Can Redistributive State Taxes Reduce Inequality?," CEPR Discussion Papers 490, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. Jon Bakija & Joel Slemrod, 2004. "Do the Rich Flee from High State Taxes? Evidence from Federal Estate Tax Returns," Department of Economics Working Papers 2004-12, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    5. Timothy J. Bartik, 2009. "What Proportion of Children Stay in the Same Location as Adults, and How Does This Vary Across Location and Groups?," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 09-145, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
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