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Productive Development Policies in Latin America: Past and Present

  • Manuel R. Agosin

This paper reviews industrial policy in Latin America from the Great Depression to our days. Its purpose is to derive some lessons for what Latin American and Caribbean countries (LAC) should do in this area. It has become clear over the last few years that LAC, if they are to accelerate their growth rates, need more than a good macroeconomic framework and the protection of property rights: they need to be more proactive in transforming their production structures, still too dependent on primary commodity exports or the assembly of final goods from imported components, sectors that are ill-suited to the productive development jumps that have been associated with high growth in the developing world over the past 60 years.

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File URL: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/uploads/publicacion/482c33520551d48c31d96de5339e407ad454315b.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Chile, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number wp382.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp382
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/

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  1. José Díaz & Gert Wagner, 2004. "Política Comercial: Instrumentos y Antecedentes. Chile en los Siglos XIX y XX," Documentos de Trabajo 223, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  2. Dani Rodrik, 2008. "Goodbye Washington Consensus, Hello Washington Confusion? A Review of the World Banks Economic Growth in the 1990s: Learning from a Decade of Reform," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 55(2), pages 135-156, June.
  3. Bertola, Luis & Ocampo, Jose Antonio, 2012. "The Economic Development of Latin America since Independence," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199662142, March.
  4. World Bank, 2005. "Economic Growth in the 1990s : Learning from a Decade of Reform," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7370.
  5. Manuel Agosin & Nicolas Grau & Christian Larrain, 2010. "Industrial Policy in Chile," Research Department Publications 4695, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
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