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Consumption asymmetry and the stock market: New evidence through a threshold adjustment model

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  • Nicholas Apergis

    (University of Macedonia, Greece)

  • Stephen M. Miller

    (University of Connecticut and University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

Abstract

This paper investigates whether stock market wealth affects real consumption asymmetrically through a threshold adjustment model. The empirical findings for the US show that wealth produces an asymmetric effect on real consumption, with negative 'news' affecting consumption less than positive 'news.' Thus, policy makers may want to focus more attention on preventing asset 'bubbles' than on responding to negative asset shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Apergis & Stephen M. Miller, 2005. "Consumption asymmetry and the stock market: New evidence through a threshold adjustment model," Working papers 2005-08, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2005-08 Note: The authors express special thanks to Angelos Antzoulatos and Plutarchos Sakellaris for their comments on an earlier draft of this paper and to Giannis Litsios, a charismatic doctorate candidate, for his valuable assistance with the software used in this work. Needless to say, the usual disclaimer applies.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gupta, Rangan & Modise, Mampho P., 2013. "Macroeconomic Variables and South African Stock Return Predictability," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 612-622.
    2. Robert-Paul Berben & Kerstin Bernoth & Mauro Mastrogiacomo, 2007. "Households' response to wealth changes: do gins or losses make a difference?," IFC Bulletins chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Proceedings of the IFC Conference on "Measuring the financial position of the household sector", Basel, 30-31 August 2006 - Volume 1, volume 25, pages 145-160 Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Rangan Gupta & Mampho P. Modise, 2012. "Valuation Ratios and Stock Return Predictability in South Africa: Is It There?," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 70-82, January.
    4. Goodness C. Aye & Rangan Gupta & Mampho P. Modise, 2015. "Do Stock Prices Impact Consumption and Interest Rate in South Africa? Evidence from a Time-varying Vector Autoregressive Model," Journal of Emerging Market Finance, Institute for Financial Management and Research, vol. 14(2), pages 176-196, August.
    5. Rangan Gupta & Mampho P. Modise, 2012. "Valuation Ratios and Stock Return Predictability in South Africa: Is It There?," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 48(1), pages 70-82, January.
    6. Gupta, Rangan & Modise, Mampho P., 2012. "South African stock return predictability in the context data mining: The role of financial variables and international stock returns," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 908-916.
    7. Till van Treeck, 2008. "Asymmetric income and wealth effects in a non-linear error correction model of US consumer spending," IMK Working Paper 06-2008, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption; Stock market; Wealth effect; Asymmetry;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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