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Households' Response to Wealth Changes: Do Gains or Losses make a Difference?

  • Robert Paul Berben
  • Kerstin Bernoth
  • Mauro Mastrogiacomo

We estimate the excess impact of financial asset capital losses relative to gains on household active savings and durable goods consumption in the Netherlands. The sample period covers both the stock market boom during the 90's, and the bear period afterwards. The results suggest that households react more to capital losses than to capital gains. Failing to take into account this asymmetry may seriously bias the estimates of the marginal propensity to consume out of wealth.

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Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department in its series DNB Working Papers with number 090.

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Date of creation: Feb 2006
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Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:090
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  17. Caballero, Ricardo J, 1994. "Notes on the Theory and Evidence on Aggregate Purchases of Durable Goods," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(2), pages 107-17, Summer.
  18. Lonnie Stevans, 2004. "Aggregate consumption spending, the stock market and asymmetric error correction," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 191-198.
  19. Disney, Richard & Andrew Henley & David Jevons, 2002. "House Price Shocks, Negative Equity and Household Consumption in the UK in the 1990s," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 64, Royal Economic Society.
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