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Perceptions of health risk and smoking decisions of young people

Author

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  • Gerking, S.D.

    (Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management)

  • Khaddaria, R.

Abstract

Using the Annenberg Perception of Tobacco Risk Survey 2, this paper finds that perceived risk deters smoking among persons aged 14–22 years who think that it is relatively difficult to quit smoking and that onset of deleterious health effects occurs relatively quickly. Perceived health risk, however, does not affect the smoking status of young people who hold the opposite beliefs. These results are consistent with predictions of rational addiction models and suggest that young people, who view smoking as more addictive and health effects as more immediate, may have greater incentive to consider long‐term health effects in their decision to smoke.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerking, S.D. & Khaddaria, R., 2012. "Perceptions of health risk and smoking decisions of young people," Other publications TiSEM 2e129465-1e69-4454-83d7-7, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiutis:2e129465-1e69-4454-83d7-7b9b1622e89a
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    File URL: https://pure.uvt.nl/portal/files/1403411/HEC_final.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Barron, Kai & Gamboa, Luis F. & Rodriguez-Lesmes, Paul, 2017. "Behavioural response to a sudden health risk: Dengue and educational outcomes in Colombia," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2017-306, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).

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