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Evaluation Periods and Asset Prices in a Market Experiment

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  • Gneezy, U.

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • Kapteyn, A.

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • Potters, J.J.M.

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

Abstract

We test whether the frequency of feedback information about the performance of an investment portfolio and the flexibility with which the investor can change the portfolio influence her risk attitude in markets. In line with the prediction of myopic loss aversion (Benartzi and Thaler (1995)), we find that more information and more flexibility result in less risk taking. Market prices of risky assets are significantly higher if feedback frequency and decision flexibility are reduced. This result supports the findings from individual decision making, and shows that market interactions do not eliminate such behavior or its consequences for prices.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Gneezy, U. & Kapteyn, A. & Potters, J.J.M., 2002. "Evaluation Periods and Asset Prices in a Market Experiment," Discussion Paper 2002-8, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:37824ad9-b4f0-472f-bde6-38de0cf9f5f6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    7. Charlene C Wu & Peter Bossaerts & Brian Knutson, 2011. "The Affective Impact of Financial Skewness on Neural Activity and Choice," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 6(2), pages 1-7, February.
    8. Laura Hueber & Rene Schwaiger, 2021. "Debiasing Through Experience Sampling: The Case of Myopic Loss Aversion," Working Papers 2021-01, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    9. Charles N. Noussair & Steven Tucker, 2013. "Experimental Research On Asset Pricing," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(3), pages 554-569, July.
    10. Michael S. Haigh & John A. List, 2005. "Do Professional Traders Exhibit Myopic Loss Aversion? An Experimental Analysis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(1), pages 523-534, February.
    11. Niko Suhonen & Jani Saastamoinen, 2018. "How Do Prior Gains and Losses Affect Subsequent Risk Taking? New Evidence from Individual-Level Horse Race Bets," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 64(6), pages 2797-2808, June.
    12. Amos Nadler & Peiran Jiao & Cameron J. Johnson & Veronika Alexander & Paul J. Zak, 2019. "The Bull of Wall Street: Experimental Analysis of Testosterone and Asset Trading," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 64(9), pages 4032-4051, September.
    13. Lasha Lanchava & Kyle Carlson & Blanka Šebánková & Jaroslav Flegr & Gideon Nave, 2015. "No Evidence of Association between Toxoplasma gondii Infection and Financial Risk Taking in Females," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(9), pages 1-17, September.
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