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The comparability of Income and Expenditure Surveys 1995, 2000 and 2005/2006

Author

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  • Derek Yu

    () (University of Stellenbosch)

Abstract

The Income and Expenditure Survey (IES) conducted by Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) between September 2005 and August 2006 was the third of its kind, after similar surveys in October 1995 and October 2000. The main purpose of the IES is to collect and provide information on income and expenditure patterns of a representative sample of households, so as to update the basket of goods and services required for the compilation of the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Nonetheless, these surveys have also become an important source of information for poverty and inequality analysis, mainly because of the absence of other detailed datasets containing income and expenditure data. There are, however, important reasons why these datasets cannot be unquestioningly compared. This paper attempts to show why. The IESs conducted in 1995 and 2000 used the recall method. In the recall method, a single questionnaire was administered to a household at a selected dwelling unit in the sample, and the responding household was required to recall income and expenditure either during the month prior to the survey or for the twelve months prior to the survey. However, in the IES conducted in 2005-2006, the diary method was used extensively for the first time in order to record the household’s daily acquisitions on a daily basis. In addition to the adoption of the diary method, the 2005-2006 IES is also different from the previous IESs in many aspects, such as sampling design, questionnaire structure, number of visits to the households, additions of some new expenditure items in the questionnaire, categorization of income and expenditure items, etc., and the focus of this paper is to look at how different the three IESs are, so as to assist researchers and policy makers when they try to analyze the IES data.

Suggested Citation

  • Derek Yu, 2008. "The comparability of Income and Expenditure Surveys 1995, 2000 and 2005/2006," Working Papers 11/2008, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers59
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    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2008/wp112008/wp-11-2008.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cally Ardington & David Lam & Murray Leibbrandt & Matthew Welch, 2005. "The Sensitivity of Estimates of Post-Apartheid Changes in South African Poverty and Inequality to key Data Imputations," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 106, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. Naeem Ahmed & Matthew Brzozowski & Thomas Crossley, 2006. "Measurement errors in recall food consumption data," IFS Working Papers W06/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Derek Yu, 2013. "Poverty and inequality estimates of National Income Dynamics Study revisited," Working Papers 05/2013, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. Ronelle Burger & Cindy Lee Steenekamp & Servaas van der Berg & Asmus Zoch, 2014. "The middle class in contemporary South Africa: Comparing rival approaches," Working Papers 11/2014, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    3. Derek Yu, 2013. "Some factors influencing the comparability and reliability of poverty estimates across household surveys," Working Papers 03/2013, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    4. Judith Streak & Derek Yu & Servaas Van der Berg, 2009. "Measuring Child Poverty in South Africa: Sensitivity to the Choice of Equivalence Scale and an Updated Profile," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 94(2), pages 183-201, November.
    5. Beegle, Kathleen & De Weerdt, Joachim & Friedman, Jed & Gibson, John, 2012. "Methods of household consumption measurement through surveys: Experimental results from Tanzania," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 3-18.
    6. Niklas Bengtsson, 2012. "The Marginal Propensity to Earn and Consume out of Unearned Income: Evidence Using an Unusually Large Cash Grant Reform," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(4), pages 1393-1413, December.
    7. Finn, Arden & Leibbrandt, Murray & Oosthuizen, Morne, 2014. "Poverty, inequality, and prices in post-apartheid South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 127, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Andreas Chai & Wolfhard Kaus, 2013. "Signalling to whom? Conspicuous spending and the local density of the social group income distribution," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2012-18, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    9. Kaus, Wolfhard, 2013. "Conspicuous consumption and “race”: Evidence from South Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(1), pages 63-73.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    South Africa; Household survey;

    JEL classification:

    • C40 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - General

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