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The causes and consequences of the 1918 influenza in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel de Kadt

    () (Department of Political Science, University of California, Merced)

  • Johan Fourie

    () (Department of Economics, Stellenbosch University)

  • Jan Greyling

    () (Department of Agricultural Economics, Stellenbosch University)

  • Elie Murard

    () (Department of Economics, Stellenbosch University)

  • Johannes Norling

    () (Department of Economics, Mount Holyoke College)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel de Kadt & Johan Fourie & Jan Greyling & Elie Murard & Johannes Norling, 2020. "The causes and consequences of the 1918 influenza in South Africa," Working Papers 12/2020, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers347
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2020/wp122020/wp122020.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2020
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hans-Joachim Voth, 2013. "The Three Horsemen of Riches: Plague, War, and Urbanization in Early Modern Europe," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(2), pages 774-811.
    2. Fintel, Dieter von & Fourie, Johan, 2019. "The great divergence in South Africa: Population and wealth dynamics over two centuries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 759-773.
    3. Robert J. Barro & José F. Ursúa & Joanna Weng, 2020. "The Coronavirus and the Great Influenza Pandemic: Lessons from the “Spanish Flu” for the Coronavirus’s Potential Effects on Mortality and Economic Activity," NBER Working Papers 26866, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Raouf Boucekkine & Bity Diene & Theophile Azomahou, 2008. "Growth Economics of Epidemics: A Review of the Theory," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 1-26.
    5. Sebastian Vollmer & Juditha Wójcik, 2017. "The long-term consequences of the global 1918 influenza pandemic: A systematic analysis of 117 IPUMS international census data sets," Working Papers 1721, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    6. Sebastian Vollmer & Juditha Wójcik, 2017. "The long-term consequences of the global 1918 influenza pandemic: A systematic analysis of 117 IPUMS international census data sets," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 242, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    7. Amanda Guimbeau & Nidhiya Menon & Aldo Musacchio, 2020. "The Brazilian Bombshell? The Long-Term Impact of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic the South American Way," NBER Working Papers 26929, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Robert J. Barro & José F. Ursua & Joanna Weng, 2020. "The Coronavirus and the Great Influenza Epidemic - Lessons from the "Spanish Flu" for the Coronavirus's Potential Effects on Mortality and Economic Activity," CESifo Working Paper Series 8166, CESifo.
    9. Sebastian Vollmer & Juditha Wójcik, 2017. "The Long-term Consequences of the Global 1918 Influenza Pandemic: A Systematic Analysis of 117 IPUMS International Census Data Sets," CINCH Working Paper Series 1708, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health.
    10. Jan C. Greyling & Philip G. Pardey, 2019. "Measuring Maize in South Africa: The Shifting Structure of Production During the Twentieth Century, 1904–2015," Agrekon, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 58(1), pages 21-41, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The paradoxes of pandemics
      by Johan Fourie in Johan Fourie's Blog on 2020-07-13 09:00:17

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spanish flu; influenza; pandemic; epidemic; health; mortality; South Africa; Covid-19;

    JEL classification:

    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania

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