IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/stc/stcp3e/2007299e.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Changing Role of Education in the Marriage Market: Assortative Marriage in Canada and the United States Since the 1970s

Author

Listed:
  • Hou, Feng
  • Myles, John

Abstract

Whether or not relative rates of assortative marriage have been rising in the affluent democracies has been subject to considerable dispute. First, we show how the conflicting empirical findings that have fueled the debate are frequently an artifact of alternative methodological strategies for answering the question. Then, drawing on comparable census data for Canada and the United States, we examine trends in educational homogamy and intermarriage with log-linear models for all marriages among young adults under 35 over three decades. Our results show that educational homogamy, the tendency of like to marry like, has unambiguously risen in both countries since the 1970s, with no sign of the U-turn in levels of intermarriage reported in some earlier comparative studies. Rising levels of marital homogamy were the result of declining intermarriage at both ends of the educational distribution. However, while trends for men and women were quite similar in Canada, they differed significantly in the United States. The overall rise in marital homogamy In the United States was partially offset by an increased tendency of women with some college education to marry 'down' the educational hierarchy. In Canada, the only sign of abatement in the trend toward greater educational homogamy was a slight increase in intermarriage among university-educated men and women during the 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Hou, Feng & Myles, John, 2007. "The Changing Role of Education in the Marriage Market: Assortative Marriage in Canada and the United States Since the 1970s," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2007299e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2007299e
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2007299&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christine Schwartz & Robert Mare, 2005. "Trends in educational assortative marriage from 1940 to 2003," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 621-646, November.
    2. Roderick Duncan, 2003. "Does Sex and the City Predict the Future of Marriage?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(3), pages 73-88.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Osberg, Lars, 2013. "Instability implications of increasing inequality: Evidence from North America," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 918-930.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; training and learning; Families; households and housing; Household characteristics; Marriage and common-law unions; Outcomes of education;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2007299e. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Brown). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/stagvca.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.