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Sticky Wages in a Stochastic DGE Model of the Business Cycle

In this paper a stochastic dynamic general equilibrium (DGE) model with capital accumulation is augmented by sticky wages. Wages are set in a staggered way as in Taylor (1980) implying that the optimal wage will be set for two periods. Prices are also sticky since there are adjustments cost of prices as in Rotemberg (1982). It is confirmed that wage staggering has a higher potential to generate persistent output responses to a money growth shock. Interestingly, adjustment costs of capital contribute strongly to output persistence. If it is not costly to adjust capital there is no output persistence at all. Price adjustment costs can strengthen the effects of money growth shocks on output in the presence of costly capital adjustment.

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Paper provided by Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht in its series Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge with number 114-04.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sie:siegen:114-04
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  1. Huang, Kevin X. D. & Liu, Zheng, 2002. "Staggered price-setting, staggered wage-setting, and business cycle persistence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 405-433, March.
  2. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 2000. "Sticky Price Models of the Business Cycle: Can the Contract Multiplier Solve the Persistence Problem?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(5), pages 1151-1180, September.
  3. Floden, Martin, 2000. "Endogenous monetary policy and the business cycle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1409-1429, August.
  4. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2001. "Nominal rigidities and the dynamic effects of a shock to monetary policy," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Jun.
  5. Ali Dib & Louis Phaneuf, 2001. "An Econometric U.S. Business Cycle Model with Nominal and Real Rigidities," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 137, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  6. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
  7. Ascari, Guido, 2000. "Optimising Agents, Staggered Wages and Persistence in the Real Effects of Money Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(465), pages 664-86, July.
  8. Taylor, John B, 1980. "Aggregate Dynamics and Staggered Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 1-23, February.
  9. Robert G. King & Alexander L. Wolman, 1996. "Inflation targeting in a St. Louis model of the 21st century," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 83-107.
  10. Torben M. Andersen, 2004. "Real and Nominal PropAgation of Nominal Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(492), pages 174-195, 01.
  11. Guido Ascari, 2004. "Staggered Prices and Trend Inflation: Some Nuisances," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(3), pages 642-667, July.
  12. Guido Ascari, 2003. "Price/Wage Staggering and Persistence: A Unifying Framework," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(4), pages 511-540, 09.
  13. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1982. "Sticky Prices in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1187-1211, December.
  14. King, Robert G & Plosser, Charles I & Rebelo, Sergio T, 2002. "Production, Growth and Business Cycles: Technical Appendix," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 87-116, October.
  15. Christopher J. Erceg, 1997. "Nominal wage rigidities and the propagation of monetary disturbances," International Finance Discussion Papers 590, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  16. King, Robert G & Watson, Mark W, 2002. "System Reduction and Solution Algorithms for Singular Linear Difference Systems under Rational Expectations," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 57-86, October.
  17. Ludger Linnemann, 1999. "Sectoral and aggregate estimates of the cyclical behavior of markups: Evidence from Germany," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 135(3), pages 480-500, September.
  18. Ireland, Peter N., 1997. "A small, structural, quarterly model for monetary policy evaluation," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 83-108, December.
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