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Habit Persistence in Consumption in a Sticky Price Model of the Business Cycle

This paper examines the role of habit persistence in consumption in explaining persistent responses of inflation and output to money growth shocks. A monetary stochastic dynamic general equilibrium (DGE) model with a money-in-the-utility-function (MIU-) setup is augmented by habit formation in consumption and evaluated for both Taylor and Calvo price staggering. It is shown that in the benchmark Taylor price staggering model consumption displays a persistent response while the volatility falls short empirical estimates. The reaction of most other aggregates including output, inflation and prices is counterfactually cyclical. Investment, labor hours and the real wage are too strongly correlated with output. In the benchmark Calvo price staggering model consumption is hump-shaped. Most variables are persistent and consumption shows a higher standard deviation. In sum, habit persistence in consumption improves the model outcome with respect to consumption's reaction while Calvo staggering improves the ability of a DGE model to explain persistent reactions of the other macroeconomic aggregates to money growth shocks.

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File URL: http://www.wiwi.uni-siegen.de/vwl/repec/sie/papers/111-03.pdf
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Paper provided by Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht in its series Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge with number 111-03.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2003
Date of revision: Jul 2004
Handle: RePEc:sie:siegen:111-03
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Web page: http://www.uni-siegen.de/fb5/vwl/research/diskussionsbeitraege/
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  1. Michael Dotsey & Robert G. King & Alexander L. Wolman, 1999. "State-Dependent Pricing And The General Equilibrium Dynamics Of Money And Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(2), pages 655-690, May.
  2. Ludger Linnemann, 1999. "Sectoral and aggregate estimates of the cyclical behavior of markups: Evidence from Germany," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 135(3), pages 480-500, September.
  3. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles Evans, 2001. "Nominal rigidities and the dynamic effects of a shock to monetary policy," Working Paper 0107, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  4. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 1996. "Sticky Price Models of the Business Cycle: Can the Contract Multiplier Solve the Persistence Problem?," NBER Working Papers 5809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. King, Robert G & Watson, Mark W, 2002. "System Reduction and Solution Algorithms for Singular Linear Difference Systems under Rational Expectations," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 57-86, October.
  6. King, Robert G. & Plosser, Charles I. & Rebelo, Sergio T., 1988. "Production, growth and business cycles : I. The basic neoclassical model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 195-232.
  7. McCallum, Bennett T. & Nelson, Edward, 1998. "Nominal Income Targeting in an Open-Economy Optimizing Model," Seminar Papers 644, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  8. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1975. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 64, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  9. King, Robert G. & Wolman, Alexander L., 2013. "Inflation Targeting in a St. Louis Model of the 21st Century," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 543-574.
  10. Bouakez, Hafedh & Cardia, Emanuela & Ruge-Murcia, Francisco J., 2005. "Habit formation and the persistence of monetary shocks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 1073-1088, September.
  11. Taylor, John B, 1980. "Aggregate Dynamics and Staggered Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 1-23, February.
  12. Michael Dotsey & Robert G. King & Alexander L. Wolman, 1997. "State-dependent pricing and the dynamics of business cycles," Working Paper 97-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  13. King, Robert G & Watson, Mark W, 1998. "The Solution of Singular Linear Difference Systems under Rational Expectations," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1015-26, November.
  14. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:5:y:2002:i:2:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
  15. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 2000. "Habit Formation in Consumption and Its Implications for Monetary-Policy Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 367-390, June.
  16. Patrick Fève & Fabrice Collard & Stéphane Auray, 2002. "Habit Persistence and Beliefs Based Liquidity Effect," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 5(2), pages 1-7.
  17. Floden, Martin, 2000. "Endogenous monetary policy and the business cycle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1409-1429, August.
  18. King, Robert G & Plosser, Charles I & Rebelo, Sergio T, 2002. "Production, Growth and Business Cycles: Technical Appendix," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 87-116, October.
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