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Inefficient Taxation of Sin Goods

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Abstract

Within an O. Donoghue and Rabin (2006) style model, we study the optimal sin taxes that a government wants to implement when consumers are time-inconsistent, and taxation is inefficient in terms of administrative, collection and compliance costs. We find that, if the inefficiency of taxation is not too large, the optimal tax is positive and it may be higher or lower than the first best depending on the elasticity of demand with respect to taxation. Finally, the extent of the distortion depends on the degree of inefficiency of taxation.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Immordino & Anna Maria C. Menichini & Maria Grazia Romano, 2015. "Inefficient Taxation of Sin Goods," CSEF Working Papers 412, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sef:csefwp:412
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. O'Donoghue, Ted & Rabin, Matthew, 2006. "Optimal sin taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(10-11), pages 1825-1849, November.
    2. Gruber, Jonathan & Koszegi, Botond, 2004. "Tax incidence when individuals are time-inconsistent: the case of cigarette excise taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1959-1987, August.
    3. Jonathan Gruber & Botond Köszegi, 2001. "Is Addiction "Rational"? Theory and Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1261-1303.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giovanni Immordino & Anna Maria C. Menichini & Maria Grazia Romano, 2020. "Taxing and Regulating Vices," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 122(2), pages 622-647, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Hyperbolic preferences; Taxation; Sin goods;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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