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Optimal Income Taxation with Multidimensional Taxpayer Types

Author

Listed:
  • Che-Lin Su

    () (CMS-EMS Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University)

  • Kenneth L. Judd

    (Hoover Institution)

Abstract

Beginning with Mirrlees, the optimal taxation literature has generally focused on economies where individuals are differentiated by only their productivity. In this pa- per we examine models with discrete types where individuals are differentiated by two or more characteristics. For example, we examine the case where individuals also have different tastes for labor supply. We find that the extra dimensionality produces substantively different results, such as negative marginal tax rates for some high pro- ductivity taxpayers. This is a difficult nonlinear optimization problem because quite often, the linear independence constraint qualification does not hold at a solution. To robustly solve these degenerate nonlinear programs, we use the solver SNOPT, an SQP method with an elastic-mode. Our computational framework proposed in this paper can also be applied to solve problems that arise in multidimensional nonlinear pricing and mechanism design

Suggested Citation

  • Che-Lin Su & Kenneth L. Judd, 2006. "Optimal Income Taxation with Multidimensional Taxpayer Types," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 471, Society for Computational Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sce:scecfa:471
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin B. Lockwood & Matthew Weinzierl, 2012. "De Gustibus non est Taxandum: Heterogeneity in Preferences and Optimal Redistribution," Harvard Business School Working Papers 12-063, Harvard Business School, revised Sep 2014.
    2. Krueger, Dirk & Ludwig, Alexander, 2016. "On the optimal provision of social insurance: Progressive taxation versus education subsidies in general equilibrium," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 72-98.
    3. Golosov, Mikhail & Troshkin, Maxim & Tsyvinski, Aleh & Weinzierl, Matthew, 2013. "Preference heterogeneity and optimal capital income taxation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 160-175.
    4. Ooghe, Erwin & Peichl, Andreas, 2010. "Fair and Efficient Taxation under Partial Control: Theory and Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 5388, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Krueger, Dirk & Ludwig, Alexander, 2013. "On the Optimal Provision of Social Insurance," MEA discussion paper series 201302, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    6. Lockwood, Benjamin B. & Weinzierl, Matthew, 2015. "De Gustibus non est Taxandum: Heterogeneity in preferences and optimal redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 74-80.
    7. Lee, Kyung-woo, 2015. "Optimal disability insurance with unobservable skill heterogeneity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 94-109.
    8. Golosov, Mikhail & Weinzierl, Matthew & Tsyvinsky, Aleh, 2010. "Preference heterogeneity and optimal capital taxation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58180, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Alexander Ludwig & Dirk Krueger, 2015. "Optimal Capital and Progressive Labor Income Taxation with Endogenous Schooling Decisions and Intergenerational Transfers," 2015 Meeting Papers 334, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. George Abuselidze, 2013. "Optimal Tax Policy - Financial Crisis Overcoming Factor," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(11), pages 1451-1459, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    optimal income taxation; multidimensional types; adverse selection; nonlinear optimization;

    JEL classification:

    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation

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