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Learning and Endogenous Business Cycles in a Standard Growth Model

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  • Laurent Cellarier

Abstract

Cyclical or chaotic competitive equilibria that do not exist under perfect foresight are shown to occur in a decentralized growth model under constant gain adaptive learning. This paper considers an economy populated by boundedly rational households making one-period ahead constant gain adaptive input price forecasts, and using simple expectation rules to predict long-run physical capital holdings and consumption. Under these hypotheses, lifetime decisions are derived as time unfolds, and analytical solutions to the representative household's problem exist for a standard class of preferences. Under various characteristics of the model's functional forms, competitive equilibrium trajectories under learning may exhibit opposite local stability properties depending whether the underlying information set accommodates all contemporary data. Calibrated to the U.S. economy, the model with boundedly rational households may exhibit endogenous business cycles around the permanent regime which is a saddle point under perfect foresight

Suggested Citation

  • Laurent Cellarier, 2005. "Learning and Endogenous Business Cycles in a Standard Growth Model," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 240, Society for Computational Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf5:240
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    File URL: http://repec.org/sce2005/up.17100.1107126850.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tjalling C. Koopmans, 1963. "On the Concept of Optimal Economic Growth," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 163, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    2. King, Robert G. & Plosser, Charles I. & Rebelo, Sergio T., 1988. "Production, growth and business cycles : I. The basic neoclassical model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 195-232.
    3. Stock, James H. & Watson, Mark W., 1999. "Business cycle fluctuations in us macroeconomic time series," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 3-64 Elsevier.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    bounded rationality; constant gain adaptive learning; endogenous business cycles;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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