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Desperately Seeking Revenue

Author

Listed:
  • Rosanne Altshuler

    () (Rutgers University, Department of Economics)

  • Katherine Lim

    () (Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center)

  • Roberton Williams

    () (Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center)

Abstract

In August 2009 the Congressional Budget Office warned that the budget was on an unsustainable path. Preventing federal debt from growing faster than the economy over the long-run requires large increases in revenues and/or decreases in spending. We explore, using the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center Model, whether incremental reforms of the current tax system could raise enough revenue to reduce the deficit to a sustainable level over the last five years of the current 10-year budget window. We conclude that feasible tax increases within the current tax structure cannot generate sufficient revenues to bring federal budget deficits under control.

Suggested Citation

  • Rosanne Altshuler & Katherine Lim & Roberton Williams, 2011. "Desperately Seeking Revenue," Departmental Working Papers 201121, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:201121
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Feldstein, 1999. "Tax Avoidance And The Deadweight Loss Of The Income Tax," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 674-680, November.
    2. Emmanuel Saez & Joel Slemrod & Seth H. Giertz, 2012. "The Elasticity of Taxable Income with Respect to Marginal Tax Rates: A Critical Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(1), pages 3-50, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    budget deficit; tax reform; individual taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H60 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - General

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