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Employment and Retirement Following a Late Career Job Loss

Author

Listed:
  • Sewin Chan

    (Rutgers University)

  • Ann Huff Stevens

    (Yale University)

Abstract

The frequency of job loss among workers in late career has risen disproportionately in recent years. The effects of job loss on these workers are potentially severe: their earnings capacity, savings, and retirement expectations are likely to be dramatically affected and they may take substantially longer to be re-employed. However, despite these reasons for heightened concern, relatively little is known about the economic consequences of late career job loss among recent cohorts of workers. This paper presents findings from an ongoing research project using the Health and Retirement Study that focuses on the economic impacts of late career job loss on employment and retirement patterns, as well as on earnings and assets.

Suggested Citation

  • Sewin Chan & Ann Huff Stevens, 1999. "Employment and Retirement Following a Late Career Job Loss," Departmental Working Papers 199903, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:199903
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David A. Wise, 1989. "The Economics of Aging," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number wise89-1, January.
    2. Kathryn H. Anderson & Richard V. Burkhauser & Joseph F. Quinn, 1986. "Do Retirement Dreams Come True? The Effect of Unanticipated Events on Retirement Plans," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(4), pages 518-526, July.
    3. Sewin Chan & Ann Huff Stevens, 1999. "Job Loss and Retirement Behavior of Older Men," NBER Working Papers 6920, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. John P. Rust, 1989. "A Dynamic Programming Model of Retirement Behavior," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Aging, pages 359-404, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Stock, James H & Wise, David A, 1990. "Pensions, the Option Value of Work, and Retirement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(5), pages 1151-1180, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    aging; employment; job loss; retirement;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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