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Learnability of a class of Non-atomic Games arising on the Internet

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  • Eric Friedman

    () (Rutgers University)

Abstract

In this paper we study a large class of non-atomic games arising from interactions on the Internet, such as many users sharing a network link, researchers accessing a database or web server, subscribers to a network services provider trying to gain access to the modem pool and many more. We provide simple and easily computable conditions under which these games are learnable by several models of learning, such as adaptive and sophisticated learning (Milgrom and Roberts 1991), calibrated learning (Foster and Vohra 1996), and reasonable learning (Friedman and Shenker 1997). Thus, using these methods one can evaluate the stability of such games on the Internet or in other settings in which players must learn over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Friedman, 1998. "Learnability of a class of Non-atomic Games arising on the Internet," Departmental Working Papers 199824, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:199824
    as

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    File URL: http://www.sas.rutgers.edu/virtual/snde/wp/1998-24.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roger Lagunoff & Akihiko Matsui, "undated". ""An 'Anti-Folk Theorem' for a Class of Asynchronously Repeated Games''," CARESS Working Papres 95-15, University of Pennsylvania Center for Analytic Research and Economics in the Social Sciences.
    2. Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason & Hal Varian, 1994. "Economic FAQs About the Internet," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(3), pages 75-96, Summer.
    3. Moulin, Herve, 1984. "Dominance solvability and cournot stability," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 83-102, February.
    4. Dean Foster & Peyton Young, "undated". "Learning with Hazy Beliefs," ELSE working papers 023, ESRC Centre on Economics Learning and Social Evolution.
    5. Friedman, Eric J., 1996. "Dynamics and Rationality in Ordered Externality Games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 65-76, September.
    6. Shaler Stidham, 1992. "Pricing and Capacity Decisions for a Service Facility: Stability and Multiple Local Optima," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 38(8), pages 1121-1139, August.
    7. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1991. "Adaptive and sophisticated learning in normal form games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 82-100, February.
    8. Foster, Dean P. & Vohra, Rakesh V., 1997. "Calibrated Learning and Correlated Equilibrium," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 21(1-2), pages 40-55, October.
    9. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1990. "Rationalizability, Learning, and Equilibrium in Games with Strategic Complementarities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(6), pages 1255-1277, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Greenwald, Amy & Friedman, Eric J. & Shenker, Scott, 2001. "Learning in Network Contexts: Experimental Results from Simulations," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 35(1-2), pages 80-123, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    learning;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games

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