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Can Buy Me Love: How Mating Cues Influence Single Men’S Interest In High-Status Consumer Goods

Author

Listed:
  • K. JANSSENS
  • M. PANDELAERE

    ()

  • K. MILLET
  • B. VAN DEN BERGH
  • I. LENS
  • R. KEITH

Abstract

In two experiments we demonstrate that men display an enhanced interest in status enhancing consumption upon exposure to mating cues. Men indicate a higher interest in high-status products (study 1) and more readily noticed high-status products (study 2) after exposure to sexily, rather than plainly, dressed women. The effects are restricted to single men, suggesting that the acquisition or consumption of a luxurious product functions as a mate attraction mechanism.

Suggested Citation

  • K. Janssens & M. Pandelaere & K. Millet & B. Van Den Bergh & I. Lens & R. Keith, 2009. "Can Buy Me Love: How Mating Cues Influence Single Men’S Interest In High-Status Consumer Goods," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 09/570, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:09/570
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    References listed on IDEAS

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