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The Impact of Social Changes on Fertility in the Regions of the North Caucasus

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  • Kazenin, Konstantin

    () (Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA))

Abstract

The paper is devoted to the method of studying the influence of social changes on the reproductive behavior of the population. Numerous studies suggest that transformations of the social order in a certain community often lead to a change in the characteristics of the birth rate in a given community. In order to study these processes, it is important to summarize the available knowledge on the kinds of social transformations which are most likely to affect fertility, and what demographic indicators are to be used when examining the changes in fertility in social transformations. Both questions are considered in the paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazenin, Konstantin, 2017. "The Impact of Social Changes on Fertility in the Regions of the North Caucasus," Working Papers 061706, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rnp:wpaper:061706
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    File URL: ftp://w82.ranepa.ru/rnp/wpaper/061706.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gangadharan, Lata & Maitra, Pushkar, 2001. "Two Aspects of Fertility Behavior in South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(1), pages 183-200, October.
    2. Peter McDonald & Meimanat Hosseini-Chavoshi & Mohammad Jalal Abbasi-Shavazi & Arash Rashidian, 2015. "An assessment of recent Iranian fertility trends using parity progression ratios," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(58), pages 1581-1602, June.
    3. Ainsworth, Martha & Beegle, Kathleen & Nyamete, Andrew, 1996. "The Impact of Women's Schooling on Fertility and Contraceptive Use: A Study of Fourteen Sub-Saharan African Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 85-122, January.
    4. Javalgi, Rajshekhar G. & Cutler, Bob D. & Malhotra, Naresh K., 1995. "Print advertising at the component level : A cross-cultural comparison of the United States and Japan," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 117-124, October.
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