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Growth models and working class restructuring before the crisis

Author

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  • Stockhammer, Engelbert

    (Kingston University London)

  • Durand, Cédric

    (CEPN Université Paris 13)

  • List, Ludwig

    (CEPN Université Paris 13)

Abstract

This paper builds on post-Keynesian macroeconomics, the Regulation Approach and a Neo-Gramscian International Political Economy approach to class analysis and offers an empirical analysis of European growth models and working class restructuring in Europe between 2000 and 2008. We will distinguish between the ‘East’, the ‘North’, and the ‘South’ and structure our analysis around industrial upgrading, financialisation and working class coherence. We find an export-driven growth model in the North, which came with wage suppression and outsourcing to the East. In the East the growth model can be characterised as dependent upgrading, which allowed for high real wage growth despite declining working class coherence. The South experienced a debt-driven growth model with a real estate bubble and high inflation rates resulting in large current account deficits. Our analysis shows that class restructuring forms an integral part in the economic process that resulted in European imbalances and the Euro crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Stockhammer, Engelbert & Durand, Cédric & List, Ludwig, 2015. "Growth models and working class restructuring before the crisis," Economics Discussion Papers 2015-4, School of Economics, Kingston University London.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:kngedp:2015_004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Christian Dustmann & Bernd Fitzenberger & Uta Sch?nberg & Alexandra Spitz-Oener, 2014. "From Sick Man of Europe to Economic Superstar: Germany's Resurgent Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(1), pages 167-188, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ewa Karwowski & Mimoza Shabani & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2016. "Financialisation: Dimensions and determinants. A cross-country study," Working Papers PKWP1619, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    European growth models; class analysis; labour relations; debt-driven growth; financialisation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B50 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - General
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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