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Long-Run and Short-Run Effects of Money Injections

Listed author(s):
  • Tsz-Nga Wong

    (Bank of Canada)

  • Pierre-Olivier Weill

    (UCLA)

  • Guillaume Rocheteau

    (University of California, Irvine)

We construct a tractable model of monetary exchange with search and bargaining that features a non-degenerate distribution of money holdings in which one can study the short-run and long-run effects of changes in the money supply. While money is neutral in the long run, an unanticipated, one-time, money injections in a centralized market with flexible prices and unrestricted participation generates an increase in aggregate real balances and aggregate output, a decrease in the rate of return of money, and a redistribution of output and consumption levels across agents in the short run. Moreover, the initial impact on the price level is non-monotonic with the size of the money injection, e.g., small injections can lead to a deflation followed by inflation. We also study repeated money injections and show they can lead to higher output and higher welfare.

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File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2015/paper_793.pdf
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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2015 Meeting Papers with number 793.

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Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:793
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Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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  1. Stephen D. Williamson, 2006. "Search, Limited Participation, And Monetary Policy ," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(1), pages 107-128, 02.
  2. Guillaume Rocheteau & Randall Wright, 2005. "Money in Search Equilibrium, in Competitive Equilibrium, and in Competitive Search Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(1), pages 175-202, 01.
  3. Miguel Molico, 2006. "The Distribution Of Money And Prices In Search Equilibrium," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 701-722, 08.
  4. Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2005. "A Unified Framework for Monetary Theory and Policy Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(3), pages 463-484, June.
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  7. Menzio, Guido & Shi, Shouyong & Sun, Hongfei, 2013. "A monetary theory with non-degenerate distributions," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(6), pages 2266-2312.
  8. Faig, Miquel & Li, Zhe, 2009. "The welfare costs of expected and unexpected inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(7), pages 1004-1013, October.
  9. Zhu, Tao, 2005. "Existence of a monetary steady state in a matching model: divisible money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 123(2), pages 135-160, August.
  10. Edward J. Green & Ruilin Zhou, 2002. "Dynamic Monetary Equilibrium in a Random Matching Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 929-969, May.
  11. Ricardo Lagos & Guillaume Rocheteau, 2005. "Inflation, Output, And Welfare," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(2), pages 495-522, 05.
  12. Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre-Olivier Weill & Tsz-Nga Wong, 2015. "A Tractable Model of Monetary Exchange with Ex-post Heterogeneity," NBER Working Papers 21179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Chiu, Jonathan & Molico, Miguel, 2010. "Liquidity, redistribution, and the welfare cost of inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(4), pages 428-438, May.
  14. Zhu, Tao, 2008. "An overlapping-generations model with search," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 318-331, September.
  15. Jonathan Chiu & Miguel Molico, 2011. "Uncertainty, Inflation, and Welfare," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 487-512, October.
  16. Scheinkman, Jose A & Weiss, Laurence, 1986. "Borrowing Constraints and Aggregate Economic Activity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(1), pages 23-45, January.
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