IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/red/sed012/390.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Collateral constraints and macroeconomic volatility

Author

Listed:
  • Winfried Koeniger

    (Queen Mary University of London)

  • Thomas Hintermaier

    (Economics, Univ Bonn)

Abstract

We show how realistic occasionally binding collateral constraints increase macroeconomic volatility. Collateral constraints imply that the effect of consumers' choices on the price of collateral feeds back into the set of feasible choices, thus giving rise to multiple equilibria. We characterize how the possibility of multiple equilibria depends on aggregate wealth. We find that for low levels of wealth the economy is vulnerable to changes of consumer confidence (sunspots) which increase the volatility of prices and consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Winfried Koeniger & Thomas Hintermaier, 2012. "Collateral constraints and macroeconomic volatility," 2012 Meeting Papers 390, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed012:390
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2012/paper_390.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Johannes Brumm & Michael Grill & Felix Kubler & Karl Schmedders, 2015. "Collateral Requirements And Asset Prices," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 1-25, February.
    2. Zhigang Feng & Jianjun Miao & Adrian Peralta‐Alva & Manuel S. Santos, 2014. "Numerical Simulation Of Nonoptimal Dynamic Equilibrium Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55, pages 83-110, February.
    3. Karen Kopecky & Richard Suen, 2010. "Finite State Markov-chain Approximations to Highly Persistent Processes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(3), pages 701-714, July.
    4. Patrick Bajari & Phoebe Chan & Dirk Krueger & Daniel Miller, 2013. "A Dynamic Model Of Housing Demand: Estimation And Policy Implications," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54(2), pages 409-442, May.
    5. Enrique G. Mendoza, 2010. "Sudden Stops, Financial Crises, and Leverage," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 1941-1966, December.
    6. Harold L. Cole & Timothy J. Kehoe, 2000. "Self-Fulfilling Debt Crises," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(1), pages 91-116.
    7. Hintermaier, Thomas & Koeniger, Winfried, 2010. "The method of endogenous gridpoints with occasionally binding constraints among endogenous variables," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 2074-2088, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:red:sed012:390. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Zimmermann). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sedddea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.