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Country Patterns of Behaviour on Broader Dimensions of Human Development

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  • Gustav Ranis, Frances Stewart and Emma Samman

Abstract

The paper adopts a more expansive definition of Human Development than that encompassed by the Human Development Index and explores alternative patterns of country behavior in terms of this broader definition. We categorize countries according to their behavior on basic human development, and economic, social and political dimensions, and then examine their performance relative to one another and across categories. We identify countries which seem to do particularly well on one dimension and less well on others, or particularly badly on one dimension and better on others, as well as managing to do well on all, or failing to do well on any. The analysis reveals that not all good things go together, i.e., only seven out of 130 countries with data for all four categories were categorized in the same way across categories - while half of the sample exhibited deficiency or superiority in a particular category. The many patterns of behavior indicate that while countries are constrained by history, culture and initial conditions, they also have choices. Even low income countries can achieve well in all categories, and high income countries, poorly.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustav Ranis, Frances Stewart and Emma Samman, "undated". "Country Patterns of Behaviour on Broader Dimensions of Human Development," QEH Working Papers qehwps154, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:qeh:qehwps:qehwps154
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    File URL: http://www3.qeh.ox.ac.uk/RePEc/qeh/qehwps/qehwps154.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ranis, Gustav & Stewart, Frances & Ramirez, Alejandro, 2000. "Economic Growth and Human Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 197-219, February.
    2. Suri, Tavneet & Boozer, Michael A. & Ranis, Gustav & Stewart, Frances, 2011. "Paths to Success: The Relationship Between Human Development and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 506-522, April.
    3. Deepa Narayan & Robert Chambers & Meera K. Shah & Patti Petesch, 2000. "Voices of the Poor : Crying Out for Change," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13848.
    4. Gustav Ranis & Frances Stewart & Emma Samman, 2006. "Human Development: Beyond the Human Development Index," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 323-358.
    5. Gustav Ranis, Frances Stewart and Emma Samman, "undated". "Human Development: beyond the HDI," QEH Working Papers qehwps135, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    6. Gene M. Grossman (ed.), 1996. "Economic Growth," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, volume 0, number 553.
    7. Auty, Richard M., 2001. "The political economy of resource-driven growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 839-846, May.
    8. Alkire, Sabina, 2005. "Valuing Freedoms: Sen's Capability Approach and Poverty Reduction," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199283316.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gustav Ranis, 2009. "Economics, Area Studies and Human Development," Working Papers 975, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    2. Rakesh Gupta N.R., 2015. "Economic Development: Is Social Capital Persistent?," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 15002, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    3. Rakesh N R Gupta, 2015. "Economic Development: Is Social Capital Persistent?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01157891, HAL.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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