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Tax Policy Forum: Review of Tax Expenditures, Budget 2016

Author

Listed:
  • Chapman, Larry
  • McKenzie, Ken
  • Porter, Shawn
  • Tedds, Lindsay M.

Abstract

In the 2016 budget the Department of Finance announced that it intended to review a number of tax expenditures with the objective of identifying and eliminating poorly targeted or inefficient tax measures. In this article, the authors discuss the concept and theory of tax expenditures and then debate the merits of some of the more significant tax expenditures with the objective of identifying those that might be considered poorly targeted or inefficient.

Suggested Citation

  • Chapman, Larry & McKenzie, Ken & Porter, Shawn & Tedds, Lindsay M., 2017. "Tax Policy Forum: Review of Tax Expenditures, Budget 2016," MPRA Paper 96926, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:96926
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/96926/1/MPRA_paper_96926.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital gains fiscal policy; efficiency; fairness; policy making; small business; stock options; tax expenditures;

    JEL classification:

    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General

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