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Environmental policy in dynamic models with pollution by consumers: The impact of exogenous shocks and dozy politicians

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  • Barthel, Jens

Abstract

The paper discusses questions resulting from a study of the interaction of exogenous shocks and environmental policy. In a model with pollution as a side effect of consumption environmental policy is introduced in the form of a consumption tax with or without a subsidy on eco-friendly investments. In simulations we observe the dynamic behavior of models before and after sudden changes of exogenous variables. These shocks are jumps in productivity or a sudden depreciation of capital. Additionally we examine the effect of a simultaneous appearance of both types of shocks. Furthermore we investigate the consequences of a lagged reaction of the policy agents.

Suggested Citation

  • Barthel, Jens, 2007. "Environmental policy in dynamic models with pollution by consumers: The impact of exogenous shocks and dozy politicians," MPRA Paper 8229, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:8229
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/8229/1/MPRA_paper_8229.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bovenberg, A Lans & Smulders, Sjak A, 1996. "Transitional Impacts of Environmental Policy in an Endogenous Growth Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(4), pages 861-893, November.
    2. Chung-Huang Huang & Deqin Cai, 1994. "Constant-returns endogenous growth with pollution control," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 4(4), pages 383-400, August.
    3. Smulders, Sjak & Gradus, Raymond, 1996. "Pollution abatement and long-term growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 505-532, November.
    4. Ligthart, Jenny E. & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 1994. "Pollution, the cost of public funds and endogenous growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 339-349, December.
    5. Lans Bovenberg, A. & Smulders, Sjak, 1995. "Environmental quality and pollution-augmenting technological change in a two-sector endogenous growth model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 369-391, July.
    6. Raymond Gradus & Sjak Smulders, 1993. "The trade-off between environmental care and long-term growth—Pollution in three prototype growth models," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, February.
    7. Lans Bovenberg, A. & de Mooij, Ruud A., 1997. "Environmental tax reform and endogenous growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 207-237, January.
    8. Brunner, Martin & Strulik, Holger, 2002. "Solution of perfect foresight saddlepoint problems: a simple method and applications," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 737-753, May.
    9. Bohm, Peter & Russell, Clifford S., 1985. "Comparative analysis of alternative policy instruments," Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics,in: A. V. Kneese† & J. L. Sweeney (ed.), Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 395-460 Elsevier.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Policy Instruments; Exogenous Shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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