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Empirical evidence on renewable electricity, greenhouse gas emissions and feed-in tariffs in Czech Republic and Germany

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  • Janda, Karel
  • Tyuleubekov, Sabyrzhan

Abstract

In this paper we estimated relation between greenhouse gas abatement and share of renewable energy resources in Germany and Czech Republic. We also analysed the dependence between annual installed capacities of RES and respective feed-in tariffs. We took the empirical data of annual installed capacities and regressed it on respective feed-in tariffs (FIT) and/or their polynomials. The analysis resulted in optimum intervals for some types of RES, which are summarised in our paper. We could not collect most of the data for the Czech Republic, since the Energy Regulatory Office of the Czech Republic does not publish the time series for RES, unlike Germany, which publishes a comprehensive database regarding RES. Optimum intervals in our paper indicate at which values of FIT the biggest amount of installed capacities is anticipated. Thus, if FIT scheme to be continued after 2017, FITs should be set inside these intervals. These intervals assume that there are not any caps and restrictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Janda, Karel & Tyuleubekov, Sabyrzhan, 2016. "Empirical evidence on renewable electricity, greenhouse gas emissions and feed-in tariffs in Czech Republic and Germany," MPRA Paper 75444, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:75444
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frondel, Manuel & Ritter, Nolan & Schmidt, Christoph M. & Vance, Colin, 2010. "Economic impacts from the promotion of renewable energy technologies: The German experience," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4048-4056, August.
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    3. Průša, Jan & Klimešová, Andrea & Janda, Karel, 2013. "Consumer loss in Czech photovoltaic power plants in 2010–2011," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 747-755.
    4. Philippe Menanteau & Dominique Finon & Marie-Laure Lamy, 2003. "Prices versus quantities :environmental policies for promoting the development of renewable energy," Post-Print halshs-00480457, HAL.
    5. Jan Prusa & Andrea Klimesova & Karel Janda, 2013. "Consumer Loss in Czech Photovoltaic Power Plants," CAMA Working Papers 2013-50, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewable energy; feed-in tariff; Czech renewables; German Renewables;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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