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How does the health sector benefit from trade openness? Evidence form panel data across sub-Saharan Africa countries

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  • Novignon, Jacob
  • Atakorah, Yaw Boateng

Abstract

The linkages between international trade integration and economic performance has received significant attention from both policy makers and researchers. There seem to be consensus in the literature to suggest that improved trade openness corresponds to improved economic growth. A missing link in the literature is how trade openness affects specific sectors of the economy. Here we argue that trade openness has significant impact on population health and health financing. The study employed panel data for forty-two (42) Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries over the period 1995-2013. Population health status was measured by total life expectancy at birth, infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate. Three main estimation procedures were used; (i) Fixed effect (FE), (ii) Random Effect (RE) and (iii) the Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) models were employed in estimating the relationships. The results showed a positive and significant relationship between trade openness and life expectancy, negative and significant relationship between trade openness and infant mortality rate and negative relationship between trade openness and under-five mortality rate. A positive relationship between trade openness and health financing. The findings of the study support international trade integration across countries in SSA and emphasizes the need for countries to be conscious of gains from trade within sub-sectors of the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Novignon, Jacob & Atakorah, Yaw Boateng, 2016. "How does the health sector benefit from trade openness? Evidence form panel data across sub-Saharan Africa countries," MPRA Paper 72258, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:72258
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Papageorgiou, Chris & Savvides, Andreas & Zachariadis, Marios, 2007. "International medical technology diffusion," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 409-427, July.
    2. Philip Stevens & Jasson Urbach & Gabrielle Wills, 2013. "Healthy Trade: The Relationship Between Open Trade and Health," Foreign Trade Review, , vol. 48(1), pages 125-135, February.
    3. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-255, March-Apr.
    4. Bichaka Fayissa & Paulos Gutema, 2008. "A Health Production Function for Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)," Working Papers 200808, Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance.
    5. Levine, David I. & Rothman, Dov, 2006. "Does trade affect child health?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 538-554, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. AIGHEYISI Oziengbe Scott & OLIGBI O. Blessing, 2019. "Trade Openness, Foreign Direct Investment And Life Expectancy In Nigeria," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 351-365, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International trade; health status; health financing; SSA;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health

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