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Live and Let Live: Sustainable Heterogeneity Will Generally Prevail

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  • Harashima, Taiji

Abstract

As is well known, the most patient household (i.e., the household possessing the lowest rate of time preference) will eventually own all capital in an economy if it behaves unilaterally without considering the optimality of the other households. This paper shows that choosing to engage in unilateral behavior is not always better for the most patient household than choosing multilateral behavior because unilateral behavior results in fewer educational opportunities for most people and constrains innovation in technologically advanced societies. Therefore, the rate of growth on the path when unilateral behavior is taken will be generally lower than that on the path when multilateral behavior is taken.

Suggested Citation

  • Harashima, Taiji, 2016. "Live and Let Live: Sustainable Heterogeneity Will Generally Prevail," MPRA Paper 71887, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:71887
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/71887/1/MPRA_paper_71887.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sustainable heterogeneity; Endogenous growth; Innovation; Education; Inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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