IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Predictors of Well-Being in High Income, Industrialized Countries and Their Related Effects

  • Holcomb, Christopher

Motivated by both: academic research illuminating the diminishing returns nature of the relationship between income and subjective well-being, and the recent development of composite indices as alternatives to GDP, this paper seeks to analyze empirically the relationship between a variety of macro-level indicators and subjective well-being. As there has been a paucity of research on this subject on just high-income countries, the paper looks at only those countries and finds that the effects of GDP do indeed diminish in comparison to low-income countries. Furthermore, the empirical analysis overall supports the thesis that as GDP rises, the values of countries shift from personal survival and economic opportunity towards larger government, less working hours, and more emphasis on trust in institutions and people.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 53012.

in new window

Date of creation: 26 Apr 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:53012
Contact details of provider: Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Dolan, Paul & Peasgood, Tessa & White, Mathew, 2008. "Do we really know what makes us happy A review of the economic literature on the factors associated with subjective well-being," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 94-122, February.
  2. Brent Bleys, 2012. "Beyond GDP: Classifying Alternative Measures for Progress," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 109(3), pages 355-376, December.
  3. Stutzer, Alois & Frey, Bruno S., 2010. "Recent Advances in the Economics of Individual Subjective Well-Being," IZA Discussion Papers 4850, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. SARRACINO Francesco, 2010. "Determinants of Subjective Well-Being in High and Low Income Countries: do happiness equations differ across countries?," LISER Working Paper Series 2010-15, LISER.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:53012. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.