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Demography of political economy : the baby-boom generation

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  • Belliveau, Stefan

Abstract

This working paper attributes a (potential) path of per-capita US output to demographic effects of the post-war baby boom. To the extent that the baby-boom generation predominates among age cohorts in the US population, a life-cycle model suggests a secular trend in per-capita GDP that is largely congruent with realized (and realizing) potential economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Belliveau, Stefan, 2013. "Demography of political economy : the baby-boom generation," MPRA Paper 46912, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:46912
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/46912/1/MPRA_paper_46912.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alan J. Auerbach & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Robert Hagemann & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 1989. "The Dynamics of an Aging Population: The Case of Four OECD Countries," NBER Working Papers 2797, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demography; US; 1945-2046; economic growth; neoclassical growth model; population dynamics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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