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The Calculating Auctioneer, Enlightened Wage Setters, and the Fingers of the Invisible Hand


  • Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont


The formal foundations of theoretical economics must be nonbehavioral and epitomize the interdependence of real and nominal variables that constitutes the monetary economy. This is a cogent conclusion from the persistent collapse of behavioral and real models. Conceptual rigor demands, first, to take objective-structural axioms as a formal point of departure and, secondly, to clarify the interrelations of the fundamental concepts income and profit. The present paper reconstructs the characteristic properties of a Walrasian economy in structural axiomatic terms, generalizes them and explores the consequences for our understanding of the working of the economy we happen to live in.

Suggested Citation

  • Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont, 2013. "The Calculating Auctioneer, Enlightened Wage Setters, and the Fingers of the Invisible Hand," MPRA Paper 44977, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:44977

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Frank Ackerman, 2001. "Still dead after all these years: interpreting the failure of general equilibrium theory," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 119-139.
    2. Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont, 2011. "Reconstructing the Quantity Theory (I)," MPRA Paper 32421, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont, 2013. "Confused confusers. How to stop thinking like an economist and start thinking like a scientist," MPRA Paper 44046, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont, 2011. "Schumpeter and the essence of profit," MPRA Paper 31176, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont, 2011. "Primary and secondary markets," MPRA Paper 32996, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont, 2003. "How to Get Rid of Demand–Supply–Equilibrium for Good," MPRA Paper 46917, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    new framework of concepts; structure-centric; axiom set; analytical rigor; market clearing; budget balancing; competitive structure; deflationary bias;

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D46 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Value Theory
    • D51 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Exchange and Production Economies

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