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Elements of novelty, known mechanisms, and the fundamental causes of the recent crisis

  • Russo, Alberto

We briefly describe the recent evolution of the crisis and, by reviewing some of its explanations based on different theories, we proceed towards our own interpretation. The deregulation wave of the last decades has created new profit opportunities in various contexts – from labour flexibility to privatisation, from financialisation to globalisation – so promoting a renewed process of capitalist accumulation after the stagflation of the 1970s. This has taken place at the cost of a wide-ranging increase of inequality and instability, thus implying a crescendo of crises until the last one (and maybe beyond).

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/41088/1/MPRA_paper_41088.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 41088.

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Date of creation: 06 Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:41088
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  1. Deepankar Basu & Ramaa Vasudevan, 2011. "Technology, Distribution and the Rate of Profit in the US Economy: Understanding the Current Crisis," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-32, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  2. de Cecco, Marcello, 1990. "Keynes revived : A review essay," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 179-190, August.
  3. Pietro Alessandrini & Michele Fratianni, 2009. "Resurrecting Keynes to Stabilize the International Monetary System," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 339-358, July.
  4. James Crotty, 2005. "The Neoliberal Paradox: The Impact of Destructive Product Market Competition and Impatient Finance on Nonfinancial Corporations in the Neoliberal Era," Research Briefs rb2003-5, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 8973.
  6. Bernanke, B. & Gertler, M. & Gilchrist, S., 1998. "The Financial Accelerator in a Quantitative Business Cycle Framework," Working Papers 98-03, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  7. William Milberg & Deborah Winkler, 2010. "Financialisation and the dynamics of offshoring in the USA," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(2), pages 275-293, March.
  8. Hyman P. Minsky, 1992. "The Financial Instability Hypothesis," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_74, Levy Economics Institute.
  9. Till van Treeck, 2009. "The macroeconomics of "financialisation" and the deeper origins of the world economic crisis," IMK Working Paper 9-2009, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  10. Ozgür Orhangazi, 2008. "Financialisation and capital accumulation in the non-financial corporate sector:," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(6), pages 863-886, November.
  11. Thomas I. Palley, 2009. "The Limits of Minsky’s Financial Instability Hypothesis as an Explanation of the Crisis," IMK Working Paper 11-2009, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  12. Gatti, Domenico Delli & Gallegati, Mauro & Greenwald, Bruce C. & Russo, Alberto & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2012. "Mobility constraints, productivity trends, and extended crises," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 375-393.
  13. Merih Uctum & Sandra Viana, 1999. "Decline in the US profit rate: a sectoral analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(12), pages 1641-1652.
  14. Engelbert Stockhammer, 2004. "Financialisation and the slowdown of accumulation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(5), pages 719-741, September.
  15. Freeman, Alan, 2009. "What makes the US Profit Rate Fall?," MPRA Paper 14147, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Delli Gatti, Domenico & Gallegati, Mauro & Greenwald, Bruce & Russo, Alberto & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2010. "The financial accelerator in an evolving credit network," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1627-1650, September.
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