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The Budapest liquidity measure and the price impact function

  • Gyarmati, Ákos
  • Lublóy, Ágnes
  • Váradi, Kata

During the 2007/2008 global economic crisis, market liquidity became an important issue both on the field of theoretical finance and in practice. In theory market liquidity is usually being modeled with price impact functions. In this study we show how the price impact function can be estimated from order book data. Our estimation is based on the Budapest Liquidity Measure (BLM) which is a liquidity measure that captures the transaction cost nature of liquidity. The main outcome of this paper is a method with which market participants can easily estimate price impact functions. This is of major importance, as the price impact function can be a useful tool during a dynamic portfolio optimization process. The price impact functions can help investors in their trading decisions.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 40339.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40339
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  1. Challet, Damien & Stinchcombe, Robin, 2001. "Analyzing and modeling 1+1d markets," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 300(1), pages 285-299.
  2. Barclay, Michael J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1993. "Stealth trading and volatility : Which trades move prices?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 281-305, December.
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  8. Kempf, Alexander & Korn, Olaf, 1999. "Market depth and order size1," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 29-48, February.
  9. Vasiliki Plerou & Parameswaran Gopikrishnan & Xavier Gabaix & H. Eugene Stanley, 2001. "Quantifying Stock Price Response to Demand Fluctuations," Papers cond-mat/0106657, arXiv.org.
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  11. Jerry A. Hausman & Andrew W. Lo & A. Craig MacKinlay, 1991. "An Ordered Probit Analysis of Transaction Stock Prices," NBER Working Papers 3888, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Marc Potters & Jean-Philippe Bouchaud, 2002. "More statistical properties of order books and price impact," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 0210710, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
  13. Kutas, Gábor & Végh, Richárd, 2005. "A Budapest Likviditási Mérték bevezetéséről. A magyar részvények likviditásának összehasonlító elemzése a budapesti, a varsói és a londoni értéktőzsdéken
    [Introduction of the Budapest Liquidity Mea
    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(7), pages 686-711.
  14. P. Weber & B. Rosenow, 2005. "Order book approach to price impact," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 357-364.
  15. Niemeyer, Jonas & Sandås, Patrik, 1995. "An Empirical Analysis of the Trading Structure at the Stockholm Stock Exchange," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 44, Stockholm School of Economics.
  16. Lublóy, Ágnes & Gyarmati, Ákos & Váradi, Kata, 2012. "Virtuális árhatás a Budapesti Értéktőzsdén
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    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 508-539.
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