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Inequality in democracy: Insights from an empirical analysis of political dynasties in the 15th Philippine Congress

Author

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  • Beja Jr, Edsel
  • Mendoza, Ronald U.
  • Venida, Victor S.
  • Yap, David B.

Abstract

This paper presents metrics to estimate the size of political dynasties in the 15th Congress of the Republic of the Philippines and analyze the relationship between political dynasty and socio-economic outcomes. Results show that political dynasties comprise 70 percent of jurisdiction-based legislators in the current Congress. They possess higher net worth and win elections by larger margins of victory compared to not political dynasties. Jurisdictions of political dynasties are characterized by lower standards of living, lower human development, and higher levels of deprivation and inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Beja Jr, Edsel & Mendoza, Ronald U. & Venida, Victor S. & Yap, David B., 2012. "Inequality in democracy: Insights from an empirical analysis of political dynasties in the 15th Philippine Congress," MPRA Paper 40104, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40104
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/40104/1/MPRA_paper_40104.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Morrisson & Fabrice Murtin, 2009. "The Century of Education," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-42.
    2. Fabrice Murtin & Romain Wacziarg, 2014. "The democratic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 141-181, June.
    3. Orville Jose C. Solon & Raul V. Fabella & Joseph J. Capuno, 2001. "Is Local Development Good Politics? Local Development Expenditures and the Re-election of Governors in the Philippines for 1992, 1995 and 1998," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200104, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    4. Dani Rodrik, 2007. "Introductiion to One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth," Introductory Chapters,in: One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth Princeton University Press.
    5. Ernesto Dal Bó & Pedro Dal Bó & Jason Snyder, 2009. "Political Dynasties," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(1), pages 115-142.
    6. Acemoglu,Daron & Robinson,James A., 2009. "Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521671422.
    7. Plumper, Thomas & Martin, Christian W, 2003. "Democracy, Government Spending, and Economic Growth: A Political-Economic Explanation of the Barro-Effect," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 117(1-2), pages 27-50, October.
    8. Balisacan, Arsenio M. & Fuwa, Nobuhiko, 2004. "Going beyond Crosscountry Averages: Growth, Inequality and Poverty Reduction in the Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 1891-1907, November.
    9. repec:cup:apsrev:v:87:y:1993:i:03:p:567-576_10 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Yasushi Asako & Takeshi Iida & Tetsuya Matsubayashi & Michiko Ueda, 2014. " Dynastic Politicians: Theory and Evidence from Japan," Working Papers 1412, Waseda University, Faculty of Political Science and Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mendoza, Ronald & Beja Jr, Edsel & Venida, Victor & Yap, David, 2013. "Political dynasties and poverty: Resolving the “chicken or the egg” question," MPRA Paper 48380, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Yasushi Asako & Takeshi Iida & Tetsuya Matsubayashi & Michiko Ueda, 2014. " Dynastic Politicians: Theory and Evidence from Japan," Working Papers 1412, Waseda University, Faculty of Political Science and Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Democracy; political dynasty; Philippines; Philippine Congress;

    JEL classification:

    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • P00 - Economic Systems - - General - - - General
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General

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